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Author Topic: Bee vac--- negative pressure  (Read 1033 times)
nella
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Location: Allentown, Pa.


« on: June 17, 2009, 04:25:19 PM »

What is the maximum number in inches on a vacuum gauge(or fraction of an inch) that a bee vac can be operated at without hurting the bees?
« Last Edit: June 17, 2009, 08:11:45 PM by nella » Logged
chad
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Location: sebring , florida


« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 07:42:09 PM »

7 inches. grin Just kidding,I don't really understand your question.Wish I could help.I just adjust mine with vents until it just pulls them off gently.I adjust it because I will use anywhere from 10 to 50 foot of hose.
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NasalSponge
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2009, 08:42:05 PM »

Would that be inches of water or inches of mercury?
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nella
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Location: Allentown, Pa.


« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2009, 04:34:00 AM »

Because pressure was once commonly measured by its ability to displace a column of liquid in a manometer, pressures are often expressed as a depth of a particular fluid (e.g. inches of water). The most common choices are mercury (Hg) and water; water is nontoxic and readily available, while mercury's density allows for a shorter column (and so a smaller manometer) to measure a given pressure.
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Ross
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« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2009, 12:11:19 PM »

Just enough pressure that a bee can hang on for a few seconds before giving up and being sucked in.  It helps to reduce the hose at the nozzle to produce a higher flow for the first few inches, then a larger bore hose the rest of the way to reduce injuries.
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