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Author Topic: first bee sting  (Read 1468 times)
fr0sty
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« on: June 10, 2009, 10:37:50 PM »

Soooo, today on my almost 2 week old hive, the top feeder was empty and I was going to take it off to clean it a bit and then put it back on Sunday.

So I did that and put the inner cover on instead. I saw a bee that looked "confused" on the feeder and let it crawl onto my pointer finger. It looked like it was squirming, and then I realized it was trying to sting me, and then *POW*, I felt the sting and the pain.

At least now I don't have to worry that I might have been allergic.

I do have 2 questions,
does anyone else have a top entrance on their hive? like a little notch in the inner and outer cover.

Also, is it okay to have the feeder off until Sunday on a brand new hive that's still in the process of drawing out comb? Or should I put it back on tomorrow? So far, the bees have gotten about 1-2 gallons of syrup or around 13 lbs of sugar. It looks like it may rain the next 2 days as well.
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riverrat
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« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2009, 11:37:02 PM »

I would keep a feeder on the hive while they are building comb unless you have a good strong flow going on

I run a top entrance on all my hives using a notch in the inner cover
« Last Edit: June 11, 2009, 08:10:39 AM by riverrat » Logged

never take the top off a hive on a day that you wouldn't want the roof taken off your house
Cheryl
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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2009, 12:31:00 AM »

At least now I don't have to worry that I might have been allergic.
Actually, it's on your second sting that you find out if you are allergic or not. Here's hoping you were also stung earlier in life, and this really is a second/third sting (or so).
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dgc1961
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2009, 06:35:30 AM »

When I was a kid I was stung only "once" and ended up in the hospital from being allergic. 

Before I got into beekeeping last year, I went to an allergest to see if I was still allergic.  Everything came back negative.
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David C.
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2009, 08:35:15 AM »

When I was a kid I was stung only "once" and ended up in the hospital from being allergic. 

Before I got into beekeeping last year, I went to an allergest to see if I was still allergic.  Everything came back negative.

I think kids can respond to stings differently as their immune system is still getting going.  They'll show signs of allergy because the immune system perceives the threats differently and react more aggressively, whereas once an adult those things start to level off.

Also, it won't hurt your hive to have the feeder off for a few days, this time of year there is ample forage.  They can store more food than they can draw comb, so in a many cases will plug up the brood nest with syrup.  In fact a lot of people cause more problems by feeding a package too much.

Rick
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Rick
phill
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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2009, 12:49:50 PM »

Sometimes I wonder whether people think they're allergic to bee stings, when actually it's something else.

OK, if you have trouble breathing after a sting, that's clear evidence. But less dramatic reactions-- itching and swelling-- could be a different story.

Usually a sting doesn't bother me much at all. But sometimes I'll get the itching and swelling, and I notice that happens more often in ragweed season. As a child I had asthma, and the test showed I'm allergic to ragweed. So I'm pretty sure I'm reacting to the ragweed that the bees have been harvesting, rather than to the bee venom itself.

I may be wrong here. I'd be happy to get some medical advice more accurate than my amateur hunch. But my theory would explain why-- for me, at least-- the reaction to stings can be so very different.
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kathyp
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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2009, 01:40:13 PM »

you are reacting the the bee venom.  that's normal.  there is a difference between a 'normal' reaction, a sensitivity, and an allergy.  an allergy can kill you.  a sensitivity can cause abnormal swelling, itching, etc.  the normal reaction causes some swelling and itching but  usually localized.
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phill
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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2009, 03:56:01 PM »

Yes, but if it's the venom, why would I be sensitive sometimes and not others?

Usually when I'm stung, I forget about it within 10 minutes. But sometimes it's still itchy and swollen 3 days later.

 
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iddee
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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2009, 05:16:40 PM »

>>>>When I was a kid I was stung only "once" and ended up in the hospital from being allergic.<<<<

You should tell your allergist. You are the first in medical history. The docs say the first sting causes changes in you body that sets up the possibility of an allergic reaction with any subsequent sting.

>>>>Yes, but if it's the venom, why would I be sensitive sometimes and not others? <<<<

1...There are two ways to be allergic. Skin, and blood. If blood, the only reactions will be when you are stung on a vein.

2... There are variances in each sting, with the potency and with the amount. Also, with the current condition of your anatomy. Therefore, there will always be a wide variety of reactions, for anyone.
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Sparky
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« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2009, 05:35:02 PM »

phill. Just to add to what kathyp and iddee commented. One thing you have to remember is not all places on the body will react the same either. Some parts are more sensitive because they contain many bore blood vessels close to the skin. The other factor might be, how much venom pumped in and how deep did it penetrate.
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Davepeg
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« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2009, 07:31:08 PM »

I do think where you get stung makes a big difference.  I was stung on the face and thought for sure I would swell up, but no, hardly any swelling or itching.  I HATE to get stung on my hands, they swell, get painful and itch like crazy.  My last sting was a few weeks ago on my thigh.  She got me through a pair of jeans.  Ended up with a raised welt that itched for a few days.  The skin is still a different color than the surrounding area!
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the kid
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« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2009, 09:34:12 PM »

Since the tip of her sting is heavily barbed, the worker bee normally loses her sting when she impales an
enemy as she attacks in self-defense or in defense of the hive. Shortly thereafter she dies as a result of a
sizable loss of internal organs and tissue. If she doesn't lose her sting but empties the venom sac the
worker is unable to replenish the venom. Adult worker bees must eat pollen (bee bread), grow, and
mature before they have a full complement of venom. Venom gradually accumulates until the bees are
about 15 days old. Hence, young bees are unable to sting effectively.
this is why stings  have a   big difference
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2009, 09:46:00 PM »

Yesterday I got stung for the 4th - or 5th time this year.  They've been progressively milder until the last one really wasn't bad at all - no swelling or itching, not much sting.   I still didn't like it.  Makes me say bad words.
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Cheryl
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« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2009, 11:58:01 PM »

... If she doesn't lose her sting but empties the venom sac the
worker is unable to replenish the venom. Adult worker bees must eat pollen (bee bread), grow, and
mature before they have a full complement of venom. Venom gradually accumulates until the bees are
about 15 days old. Hence, young bees are unable to sting effectively.
this is why stings have a big difference

Absolutely fascinating! I did not know that.
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We are what we repeatedly do.
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