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Author Topic: Finding New Apiary Site?  (Read 2035 times)
Butterchurn
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Location: Minnesota, USA


« on: March 21, 2005, 10:24:35 AM »

Sad

I need to find a new site to keep my bees. I have friends who volunteered their property, but they are both under a canopy of trees (no sun).

How do you locate new sites and get owners' permission? Would running an add in the local paper help? How about driving around and just approaching the owners of likely sites that look good? How have you been successful?

I wish I lived in the country! My place is in a housing development surronded by children and no morning sun unless I put them on front lawn where all neighbors can see.

Thanks!

Ron
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Butterchurn (Ron)
Beth Kirkley
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Location: Eastman, Georgia


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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2005, 11:42:07 AM »

I've never done it, but I would think approching people with that suggestion is a good idea, or running an ad in the paper. If when you go to talk to people, you had a good presentation as to how it'll help THEM, I'd think they'd go for it. Especially if you add in that you'll give them a certain amount of honey each harvest too. Smiley

There are farmers out there too that will pay you to put your hives on there property during pollinating time (heard about $25 per hive). But I think you have to move them after.....not sure.

If you have a local cooperative extention office, they might have some suggestions or leads.

Beth
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Anonymous
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2005, 11:47:07 AM »

An ad in the news paper can work. Drive in the farmers drive knock on the door and politely as for permission. I would only bring up the subject of payment if asked, unless you are willing to pay something.
Remember that soon it will be the farmers busy season and they won't want to talk with you untill the crops are all planted. Act Now in other words.

 Cheesy Al
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lively Bee's
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Location: East Tennessee


« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2005, 12:03:10 PM »

I look for farms with overgrowed fence lines.  Then I will knock on the door and ask If they would allow me to Place two or more hives on there farm.  I tell them about how it can help there crops. If they ask what I charge per hive I tell them all the same thing.  I do not charge to place the hive's on the property as long as the call me 48 hr be fore they spary bug killers. Then I allways give them a nice jar of honey after we harvest.

I have got calls from other farms just becouse they talked to "Joe" and he told them about me.
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Finsky
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Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2005, 03:04:06 PM »

Most important thing in new bee place is that there are no other beekeepers. You can find it out if you see how much  bees are in flowers.

Turnip rape is importand honey flower. Fireweed is as important. When I find the pasture, where is both main flowers, I go to the owner and ask permission to bring hives.

I live in a flat in the capital city, but I have bought a summer cottage from eastern Finland, and sorry to say, beekeeping was the most important thing when I choosed the cottage.

I have carried my bees to outer pastures 40 years. It is not easy to find good places. When you put hives in several places, you can see that yield may be 2-3 bigger in one place than in another, or even 5 times.
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beesharp
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2005, 10:07:22 PM »

I've had good luck with flyers posted in feed stores or conveniance stores in rural areas.

If there's any local fruits grown, drive around and look for an orchards. Then just stop and talk to the owners. The first time you do this is the hardest, after a couple times it's easy and fun.  Placing bees with fruit trees is win-win for you and the orchard owner. Typically fruit trees bloom early and give you a nice build up for later honey production.

In some areas there's tax advantages to landowners that use their property for agricultural purposes and beekeeping may qualify. Another win-win situation.

Jim
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latebee
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Location: western new york, near buffalo and niagara falls 42 50' N latitude and 78 50' W longitude


« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2005, 10:52:45 PM »

Here are a couple of situations that have been working for me. Look for farms that have vine crops(pumpkins,cucumbers,or melons) and find the owner.These guys usually wiling to pay you($35.00 t0 50.00 around here) and ask when they are applying pesticides so you can restrain your bees for 2 days. Another one that has worked is to ask members of hunting clubs if they would like to have more game to hunt on thier land. Then explain how the bees will help pollinate the local wild fruit crops to lure the game in and keep them on the club property. I have plenty of land but there is a commercial beekeeper who has a yard about 2,000 feet from my property, and he has about 15 to 25 hives here year round so I prefer to keep most of my bees a little farther away. Good luck and happy beekeeping.
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indypartridge
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Location: Brown County, IN


« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2005, 07:04:32 AM »

Is there some kind of local garden club or a Master Gardener program nearby? Contact them and ask if any members would be interested in a few hives. Since you don't live in the country, this might be a way to keep your hives closer to home!
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Butterchurn
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Location: Minnesota, USA


« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2005, 11:50:52 AM »

Thanks for the replies and advice.

I gave a call to my county extension service and they said they had no idea where to keep bees in the county and hung up.  My tax dollars at work.

I will drive around and try the garden club idea.  Put up some flyers.

I have a friend at work whose father-in-law keeps bees.  When he told his wife about my bees, she was very excited and wants me to establish some hives at their place.  They have a side yard that gets about 6 hours of sun. They also suggested their flat roof garage that gets even more sun.  They live in a heavily wooded area near a state forest.  It is a little further than I would like to drive, but I would have good bee relations with the property owners.

Thanks!

Ron
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Butterchurn (Ron)
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