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Author Topic: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio  (Read 834 times)

Offline nella

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Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« on: June 08, 2009, 02:55:29 PM »
Would anyone have an estimate how much 1 to 1 it would take to fill 1 brood frame with wax(foundationless)?

Offline Hethen57

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Re: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2009, 03:35:52 PM »
I don't have the answer, but George Imries Pink Pages say that it takes 8 pounds of nectar/syrup to make one pound of wax...so we could probably work from there and figure it out.  Needless to say, that sounds like alot of syrup....
-Mike

Offline the kid

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Re: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2009, 03:42:25 PM »
For making beeswax, each worker bee has four pairs of wax glands on
the underside of its r abdomen; these function best in 12- to 18-day-old bees, according to the needs of
the colony. Both protein (pollen) and carbohydrates (honey) are required to produce beeswax; 1 lb
beeswax, which contains about 450,000 wax scales, will provide enough wax to make 35,000 hexagonal
cells that can store 10 kg (22 lb) honey. Thus bees consume part of their food (pollen and honey) for the
purpose of converting it into nest structure -specifically cells for food storage and brood rearing. It takes
2.7 to 4.5 kg (6 to 10 lb) honey to produce 0.45 kg (1 lb) wax. (1 part honey 1.67 parts sugar)

Offline BeeHopper

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Re: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2009, 05:31:15 PM »
Wow  :-D
To be honest, I did not believe this question could be answered. What is the source, there's got to be more  ;)


For making beeswax, each worker bee has four pairs of wax glands on
the underside of its r abdomen; these function best in 12- to 18-day-old bees, according to the needs of
the colony. Both protein (pollen) and carbohydrates (honey) are required to produce beeswax; 1 lb
beeswax, which contains about 450,000 wax scales, will provide enough wax to make 35,000 hexagonal
cells that can store 10 kg (22 lb) honey. Thus bees consume part of their food (pollen and honey) for the
purpose of converting it into nest structure -specifically cells for food storage and brood rearing. It takes
2.7 to 4.5 kg (6 to 10 lb) honey to produce 0.45 kg (1 lb) wax. (1 part honey 1.67 parts sugar)

Offline the kid

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Re: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2009, 11:09:19 PM »
yes there is a lot but ,, I run in to it by mistake and bookmarked the site ,,, I have tred to get to it by googleing and ten other ways but no luck .....

try starting here

http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/53420300/AtlasoftheHoneybee.pdf


hey I just tryed it and thats were I got it from ...
IT WORKS
this one should be read by all ,,lots of good info
google this as is then click online books

usda agriculture research service /usda-ars carlhaydenbeeresearchcenter/onlinebooks

« Last Edit: June 08, 2009, 11:41:16 PM by the kid »

Offline BeeHopper

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Re: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2009, 08:31:09 AM »
Thank You  :-D

BH


yes there is a lot but ,, I run in to it by mistake and bookmarked the site ,,, I have tred to get to it by googleing and ten other ways but no luck .....

try starting here

http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/53420300/AtlasoftheHoneybee.pdf


hey I just tryed it and thats were I got it from ...
IT WORKS
this one should be read by all ,,lots of good info
google this as is then click online books

usda agriculture research service /usda-ars carlhaydenbeeresearchcenter/onlinebooks



Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Sugar water to foundationless drawn comb ratio
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2009, 08:40:19 PM »
The efficiency of wax conversion varies by the age of the bee, by when it developed it's wax glands, by how long it's been making wax (it gets more efficient over time) and so it's virtually impossible to say.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm#expenseofwax
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

 

anything