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Author Topic: I caught a swarm a week ago and could use a lot of helpful advice  (Read 775 times)
harvey
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« on: June 07, 2009, 08:33:47 PM »

Hello all,  a week ago I caught a swarm that had landed in my orchard.  I put them in a cardboard box and then two days later placed them in an old hive body a friend had given me.  the hive body has nine old frames in it and some of them had old comb and a little honey in them.  I have been checking them from a distance every day and the bees seem to be really busy.  I don't know what my next step is or if I need to do anything else right now.  Do I medicate? feed?  put on a super?  I know nothing of this hobby yet.  I have been looking on line and have been wondering about buying a new hive with supers and frames basicaly the whole ball of wax in a kit?   any help or advice would be appreciated.  Coments anyone?
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wildbeekeeper
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« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2009, 08:37:35 PM »

you should check in the hive to see that they are using the frames instead of them buikding comb anyway they want,   a set of new hive bodies frames, foundation smoker veil etc etc etc would help you start moving along.... more importantly read every page you can on here... lots of good info and in addition to that get a few books on beekeeping "beekeeping for dummies'; etc and read about your new hobby then ask questions as often as you wish on here... these people are great and will help you out!
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harvey
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« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2009, 08:42:03 PM »

what would be a good new hive and what about types of foundations?  I have heard there are several kinds?  I would like this to be as chemical free as I can just cause I don't want to harm the bees,  also I have heard of foulbroud?  what is this and how do I prevent it?   How long until I need to add another hive body, and how hard will it be to move them from this old hive into a new one?
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2009, 08:44:39 PM »

can you post your location in your profile.  it will help in answering your questions.

don't buy a kit.  you'll end up with stuff you don't need.  before we can help you decide what you need, tell us about the setup you have.  10 frames in a box?  how deep is the box.  do you have a bottom board, etc.

since they have been in there a week and are busy, you probably don't need to feed, but when we know where you are, that will help answer that question.  don't worry about treating for anything.  lets just try to get you set up and started  smiley
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harvey
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« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2009, 08:51:58 PM »

Not sure how to post my location on my icon but I am Lapeer Michigan,  kinda in the middle of the thumb area.  the hive box that the guy gave me is quite small and old.  It has nine frames in it but It might hold ten?   One is plastic and the rest are wood.  I built a platform out of 2x6 topped with cedar to set the box on.  then just kinda set it there.  the box or hive has a solid bottom,  the whole front side is open on the bottom and then there is a one inch round hole half way  up that the bees seem to realy like to use.  there is a real thin top board with a round whole in it then the cover is wood covered with galvanized metal?  That is the whole of what I know.  The bees were very docile while i moved them from the tree to the box.  after two days in the box they weren't so happy about leaving to go to the hive.  I ended up opening the box and used a small wood dowl to scrape them out and into the top of the hive.  they had already built two six inch pieces of comb on the box!  they seemed to move into the hive quickly though.  kinda just melted down between the frames.  then I put the lid on.
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Highlandsfreedom
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2009, 09:47:52 PM »

I would say you need another box and frames of the same size you have already and a smoker and a veil and a hive tool.  Beyond that its all pretty much toys to get.  I live in Colorado and here we need around 100lbs of honey to keep the bees alive for the winter Ill bet in the "thumb" you'll need about the same amount.  I use 2 deeps ( you have 3 basic sizes  deeps mediums and shallows )  that I never touch just for the bees every thing above the 2 deeps are fair game to me.  Some people use all med. some switch it up.  Just make sure they will have enough honey to last them the winter.  As for foundations their have been BOOKS written about what to use I use plastic foundations covered in bees wax from dadant & sons, they have a bunch of toys to get, but there are a bunch of differant websites to get stuff from.  I try to buy local from the shop or people around town. 

And welcome to the GREAT world of beekeeping it only gets better.  Watch out youll get bit by the bug and find your self up a 24 foot ladder hanging down cutting comb out of some strangers roof!! evil  It happens..

Dave
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2009, 05:55:15 AM »

If you care about being chemical free and want to do natural cell size, you can just put a comb guide on the frames and call that good:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm

If you really want foundation, you can buy 4.9mm wax from Dadant or Brushy Mt or Betterbee or others.  Or PF100s (deeps) or PF120s (mediums) if you prefer plastic frame/foundaion as it's 4.95mm and well accepted (an issue with plastic).

As for AFB prevention I've done nothing for decades with 100% success. Smiley

http://www.bushfarms.com/beespests.htm#afb
http://www.bushfarms.com/beescerts.htm
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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