Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 02, 2014, 08:53:08 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Would it be possible?  (Read 2277 times)
MarkF
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 30


Location: Woodstock, NB, Canada


« on: February 27, 2009, 07:52:23 PM »

I'm curious, if you bought a queen and put her and the 4 or 5 nurse bees that she comes with on a frame with honey and pollen and kept them in a temperature controlled hive, over time would they be able to build up, or would the nurse bees not be able to make enough food for the brood to get started. I'm not worried about how long it would take to build up just if she could do it?
Logged

Sting me once shame on you!
Sting me twice I guess I should have learned faster!
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2009, 08:58:29 PM »

I have always read, that you need a minimum of about 200 bees for the colony to survive. Go below that, and normal functions break down.
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2009, 11:21:30 PM »

The only concievable way that might work is in a small OB hive with all the attendent bees being newly hatched.  That way they may live along enough for some brood to hatch but that's problematical as 6 bees, counting the queen, can't begin to cover a brood nest.

It's unattainable objective.  2oo bees makes a cluster about the size of a tea cup and that is really the lower limit for covering a brood nest sufficiently to successfully raise bess to maturity.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
MarkF
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 30


Location: Woodstock, NB, Canada


« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2009, 10:44:09 AM »

Thank you for the replies, my initial idea was that if you could control the temperature that they would not need too cover the brood, but the more I thought about it I realized that the problem would be feeding the brood. I guess I'll just have to rethink the idea.
Logged

Sting me once shame on you!
Sting me twice I guess I should have learned faster!
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13694


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2009, 08:35:04 PM »

No.  It won't work.  As Bjorn said, even under ideal conditions it takes at LEAST 200.  Under normal conditions 200 won't work either..
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Utah
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 36

Location: Utah


« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2009, 07:41:54 PM »

I had a very small colony that I gave up hope on this last winter. The size of the cluster was no bigger than a medium sizeed apple. They had plenty of honey at first but on a few warmer late winter days the neighboring hives robbed them of the rest of their honey.

So, I figured I had nothing to lose by giving them some left over frame honey and I stuck a narrow 25 watt light bulb inside a frame feeder for the rest of the winter and I fed them syrup. I used a top entrance so the extension cord fit easily into the hive top but I duct taped the top entrance closed to retain heat. There was another very small bottom entrance. The light melted a hole in the side of the plastic feeder but no big deal.

Well, today this teeny little hive is now my most productive one. It grew like crazy!! Has not swarmed yet but I am watching it. As of two weeks ago, I had already pulled about 20 pounds of capped honey off of it.

I definitely think small hives can be nursed along and it does not take very long to get them up and competing with the other large hives with a little extra care and winter heat.
Logged

Utah
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15160


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2009, 08:09:21 PM »

you can always try adding a frame of brood (capped) and nurse bees.  that gives more workers and more coming.  they don't have to be so fussy with capped brood.  still a crap shoot, but an interesting experiment.  put them in a nuc.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.251 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 16, 2014, 11:08:54 PM