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Author Topic: Bee hive in tree that fell NEED HELP  (Read 1626 times)
Mikew
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Location: South central Kansas


« on: August 12, 2009, 10:01:24 AM »

Hi I have a 5 year plus old hive that's been in an old tree about 30 ft above ground that fell 2 weeks ago. The hive was completely exposed so I covered it best I could with cement blocks to keep predator's out and the bees a way in and out. With winter coming I"m not sure when I should move the hide into a box also it is 30 ft from a field that the farmer will spray next spring. I have room on my property 250 ft away from where it is now.If I leave them in the tree for the winter what do I need to do to protect them from predator's and the cold,as the hive is completely exposed on one end and on the ground? This site has a lot of great info on it and I"m learning a lot,but have a long way to go.I would greatly appreciate any help in this matter.  Thanks Mike     
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alflyguy
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Location: Talladega, AL


« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2009, 10:45:57 AM »

Two weeks is a long time for them to be on the ground. If they are still there, try to get some comb with brood into frames, collect as many bees as possible, and try to catch the queen . Put it all in a brood chamber close as possible to where the tree was and feed, feed, feed. If you can move what is left of the tree away after getting everything you can out of it.
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Beaver Dam
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Location: Texas, USA


« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2009, 09:10:43 PM »

You need to get the tree back in he orentation it was befor it fell. The hive in any other orentation will not survive. The angle of the comb keeps every thing from running out. Wrap the tree in card board and leave alone till spring or relocate to have body and feed.
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Mikew
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Location: South central Kansas


« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2009, 10:15:17 AM »

I have the part of the tree up but not completely back to original position. I noticed they have been building new combs in the position it was for it being on the ground.I don,t think I can remove them from the hollow of the tree,its very narrow,without breaking the comb up into small pieces so if I can wait till spring to move them to a box in a safe area I will.  I found that when the tree broke and fell it broke in the hive losing some comb and honey.I think they have been collecting it and putting it into new comb. I,m worried that they might not have enough food for the winter and tried to feed 1 to 1 but they don,t seem to be interested. Do I need to continue to leave food or wait a while?  Mike
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BULLSEYE BILL
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2009, 07:55:55 PM »

Hey fellow Kansan!  I too live in south central Ks, if you like you can PM me for my phone number and we can talk.

I see that a lot of the suggestions offered makes good sense for seasoned beekeepers and you may be a bit overwhelmed having no experience or equipment yet.  Waiting until spring at this point makes good sense.  Until then I would suggest that you cut the broken end of the limb square with a chain saw and screw a piece of plywood on it.  If it does not have a knothole for an entrance be sure the plywood is not tight so they can come and go.  Then stand the hive upright, not being in the exact position it was is not all that important.  I have had dozens of gums that I have removed for people and I always stood them up until I can transfer them in the spring.

Since you said that they are building comb I assume that there is brood in the limb and the bees are happily carrying on with the old queen or have since made a new one.  Deciding where to trim the other end of the limb is a bit tricky.  I usually make a cut well beyond where I think the hive ends and them make short cuts until I find hollow wood.  Probing the pithy wood before making the next cut will help keep you from cutting into the nest.  Then place a piece of plywood on that end as well.

We are having some very unusual weather this year and a lot of rain keeping the plants alive that normally dry up and die.  My bees are still bringing in honey so the fact that yours are not showing any interest in the syrup is not surprising, but keep it out for them as they need to pack their nest full to survive the winter especially if the limb is small.

Take advantage of the time between now and spring to learn all you can about bees and to make your equipment, you are beginning on a very special adventure in the world of beekeeping.
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