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Author Topic: Plastic frames  (Read 2185 times)
T.Smith
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« on: May 25, 2009, 02:03:14 PM »

I am thinking about using some of the all plastic frames pierco, rite cell etc.  I have been using wood frames with plastic foundation but am thinking that the all plastic may be more durable. Any suggestions on this subject  and brand  to use.   By the way I use all deeps.     Thanks Tracy
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homer
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« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2009, 02:15:40 PM »

I am thinking about using some of the all plastic frames pierco, rite cell etc.  I have been using wood frames with plastic foundation but am thinking that the all plastic may be more durable. Any suggestions on this subject  and brand  to use.   By the way I use all deeps.     Thanks Tracy

I bought a bunch of the all plastic standard frames from Mann Lake, and this year decided to go to the Assembled wooden frames with rite-cell foundation.  I have found that MY bees seem to take to the plastic foundation with wood frames, much better than they take to the all plastic.  Just my thoughts.
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alfred
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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2009, 03:10:31 PM »

I have been using all plastic pf120's from Mann lake and I love them. Some say to put on extra wax before use but I haven't had to. I am about to order more. I am also going to experiment with foundationless.

Alfred
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2009, 05:57:28 PM »

If you care about cell size, acceptance and price, the Mann Lake PF100 series is hard to beat.  I run all mediums so I have all PF120s.  But I have one PF100 here for measurement purposes.
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Michael Bush
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Pond Creek Farm
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« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2009, 06:56:22 PM »

I use the Mann Lake PF-100 and have had good luck with them.  The bees take to them quickly, and they have been quite durable.  My only tip is to keep them clearn before putting them in the hive.  My experience is that if there is dirt on them, the bees will not use that portion of the frame.
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Brian
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« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2009, 12:05:59 PM »

I use all Mann-Lake 120 plastic frames I'm very well satisfied with them and will soon order more.

Two hints;
Remove them from shipping box and let them air out for several days in the sun
Paint a thin coat of additional wax.

Bee-Bop
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Robo
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« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2009, 12:30:32 PM »

My personal experience is that the all plastic frames (pierco, not HSC) are very flimsy and twist a lot when full of honey and brood.  With this, and the fact that my frame grips don't work particularly well with them has casued me to drop many more than wooden frames.   My preference wood be wood frames with plastic foundation over the all plastic frames.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2009, 01:05:12 PM »

I like the PF-120s.  I have Pierco too. 

Quote
My personal experience is that the all plastic frames (pierco, not HSC) are very flimsy and twist a lot when full of honey and brood

Personally, I haven't noticed this.

Quote
With this, and the fact that my frame grips don't work particularly well with them has casued me to drop many more than wooden frames.

Yeah, this is an issue.

I also notice they build more burr comb on the tops of the plastic frames than they do the wooden frames.
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2009, 01:27:21 PM »

My personal experience is that the all plastic frames (pierco, not HSC) are very flimsy and twist a lot when full of honey and brood.  With this, and the fact that my frame grips don't work particularly well with them has casued me to drop many more than wooden frames.   My preference wood be wood frames with plastic foundation over the all plastic frames.

I've noticed the flimsiness too with the PF-100's, but it isn't a huge deal. 
I got some PF-520's cheap, and they are far more sturdy, although the cell size is slightly larger.

Rick
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alfred
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« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2009, 04:44:11 PM »

I use my frame grip all the time never had a problem with them. Can't compare though since all I have used is the pf120's
Alfred
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Robo
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« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2009, 06:30:04 PM »

I use my frame grip all the time never had a problem with them.

I guess I should clarify.  The pierco frames don't fit the cast aluminum ergo frame grips (the only grip worth owning in my opinion grin )  Can't speak for the PF frames, but does work fine with HSC frames.


rob...

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dragonfly
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« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2009, 06:51:31 PM »

I have found plastic frames to be durable, but not well-accepted, at least by my bees. My experience is that they use it as a last resort, so I am gradually pulling it out.
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alfred
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« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2009, 08:21:03 PM »

I use the frame grip from betterbee. I can see how the other design might not work as well with the plastic frames.
Alfred
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Shawn
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« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2009, 06:40:00 PM »

So a lot of people talk about the PF120 and like them. How are they different than the Pierco frames from Betterbee. I have the Pierco because they come in the hive kit and one hive does not like them, one is slow at building on them, the third loves them.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2009, 07:44:03 PM »

I notice no difference in quality however Mr. Bush's website states the PF100/PF120s are a wee bit smaller than the Pierco.  I buy the PF100/120s now instead of the Pierco for this reason.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2009, 05:53:02 PM »

5.25mm for pierco and 4.95mm for PF100s.  In bee terms that's pretty significant.
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Michael Bush
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bassman1977
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« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2009, 10:33:57 PM »

Quote
In bee terms that's pretty significant.


True that! 
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patook
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« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2009, 02:52:44 AM »

5.25mm for pierco and 4.95mm for PF100s.  In bee terms that's pretty significant.

Does that mean bees need to be regressed when moving from Dadant plasticell (5.4 I think) to the PF-100?

Perhaps this can explain the differing results as to how well the PF-100 is accepted.
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Pond Creek Farm
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« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2009, 10:11:07 PM »

I did not notice this.  I put PF-100 over a deep of large cell, and the bees drew out the plastic frames just fine.  I slowly culled the large cell out of the bottom deep and replaced it with the plastic and had no real trouble with the bees accepting it. (I have much of that pf-100 in a freezer now due to errors in other aspects of my beekeeping). 
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Brian
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