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Author Topic: Queen cell capped to soon ??  (Read 741 times)
Adam james
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« on: May 21, 2009, 04:37:29 AM »

I recently introduced some brood frames with brood and workers to my ob hive. This was on Saturday, on sunday i noticed a queen cup being drawn out from a worker cell containing a newly hatched larva and it had been flooded with royal jelly. yesterday (Wednesday) i looked in and the cell has been capped. Surly this is too soon and only means a poor virgin queen. The cell is almost similar in size to a  big drone cell only that it points downwards and is slightly longer.
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adgjoan
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2009, 05:58:39 AM »

I just took a queen rearing class and according to my notes you will have an egg for 3 days then larva for 5 days then pupa for 8 days.  My quess is the larva was more than newly hatched when you saw it.  In the class we were told that if you can  see the larva it is more than newly hatched. 

Joan
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Jack
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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2009, 08:16:16 AM »

Interesting read here. I have the exact situation on my recently rejuvinated OB hive. I thought the cell looked a bit small and they are making another similar one. Must be for insurance. I thought Ihave put too few bees in  the hive however am watching because they can really build up in such a small space once they get going.
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adgjoan
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2009, 06:04:16 PM »

If you ever get a chance to take a queen rearing class do so.  I learned a lot from 2 very knowledgeable men.  Out of the 10 grafts I did 7 are forming queen cells.  Not bad for a beginner.

Joan
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sc-bee
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« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2009, 08:38:02 AM »

Check after four days ---- remove cells that are capped in four days, started with too old larvae and will not be fed properly ( per Beeworks Queen rearing video).
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John 3:16
Scadsobees
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« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2009, 09:04:13 AM »

Silly bees, they didn't read the book!! How DO they know what they are doing???   Wink

If its an observation hive, then don't try messing with any queen cells.  You may end up with a slightly runty emergency queen, but keep in mind that she only has to lay up between 2 and 5 frames depending on your obs. hive, versus a full size hive which has 20 frames.

I've an emergency queen in mine and she does great and is going on year 3.

Relax and enjoy the show!!!
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Rick
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« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2009, 09:05:58 AM »

I'd like to add too that technically an observation hive is too small to successfully raise a good queen...but they'll do fine.  Yes, they will start more than one queen in an emergency.

From their point of veiw, the sooner they get a queen back the better.

Rick
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Rick
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