Any one have plans for a homemade elctric wire embedder?

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qa33010:
latebee,

     Here is where I got the diagram and the info on a homemade embedder; www.ag.uiuc.edu~vista/html_pubs ...click on beekeeping equipment and you should be set.

     You can also try just ag.uiuc.edu~vista and then click on pubs, then click agriculture, then click on beekeeping, and finally equipment.  I noticed that sometimes the whole address will throw me to Pluto.  Sorry!

Joseph Clemens:
Below is the link to the actual image of the plans mentioned in the above link:

http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~vista/html_pubs/BEEKEEP/CHAPT2/2-18.gif

Robo:
That is the plans that is in the "Beekeeping in the Midwest" book (A very good book I might add, especially for the price, even if you aren't in the Midwest).  It can be difficult to navigate to, so I have pasted here.

Thanks QA.....





 Beeswax comb foundation, plain or wired, produces the strongest combs if it is installed in wired frames before it is given to a colony of bees. To be acceptable to the bees, the frame wires must be embedded in the wax of the foundation. The job of embedding can be done easily and quickly by using an electrical embedder and a special embedding board shown in the construction plan on the next page. The embedder heats the wire by briefly short-circuiting a 12-volt electrical current. The embedding board serves as a base on which to press the heated wires into the beeswax of the comb foundation.

The electrical embedder consists of a transformer, used to reduce house current to 12 volts, whose output wires are connected to copper contacts at either end of a 3/4-inch-square piece of wood. There is only one critical dimension in making such an embedder. The copper contacts must be spaced so that their centers are 6 inches apart for fulldepth (9-1/8-inch) frames and approximately 2 inches apart for shallow (61/4- and 5-3/8-inch) frames. These contacts are pressed against the end portions of the wire that cross one end bar at right angles to it (see detail in construction plan). All the wire in the frame is heated at once when electrical contact is made.

The embedding board is a piece of 3/4-inch-thick lumber cut to fit closely within the frames being used. It should be approximately 7-5/8 X 16-5/8 inches for full-depth frames, narrower for shallow frames. In order for the wires to make the best possible contact with the wax, the embedding board should have a convex curve on the longer dimension of its tipper surface. From its 3/4- inch thickness in the center, the board should taper to 1/2 inch at its outer ends. The cleats beneath the board provide needed additional height.

Place the frame on the embedding board with the comb foundation (already attached) beneath the wires. While pressing on the frame, contact the wires on the end bar with the embedder. Hold it in contact only briefly, a second or two at first, until you learn how much heat is needed to sink the wires into the foundation. Too long a contact will produce heat enough to cut plain foundation into strips or to melt wax away from the intersection of vertical and horizontal wires. Before embedding foundation, be sure it is warm, at least at room temperature. Afterwards, do not subject it to cold temperatures because the contraction and later expansion of the wax may cause the foundation to pull away from the wires.

qa33010:
Quote from: Joseph Clemens

Below is the link to the actual image of the plans mentioned in the above link:

http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~vista/html_pubs/BEEKEEP/CHAPT2/2-18.gif




     Thanks!!!  I can't seem to get it right.

qa33010:
Quote from: Joseph Clemens

Below is the link to the actual image of the plans mentioned in the above link:

http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~vista/html_pubs/BEEKEEP/CHAPT2/2-18.gif




     Thanks!!!  I can't seem to get it right.

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