Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 18, 2014, 07:07:12 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: will a swarm produce honey  (Read 993 times)
Bee Whisper82
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 73


Location: Knoxville TN


« on: May 17, 2009, 01:03:42 AM »

Hey,
     I have a question I am new to beekeeping and I have 3 hives this year that my father-in-law caught for me and I was wondering will a swarm produce honey and how much and if any when to check. Is it alright to check every week or check every 2 weeks. Any advice or ideas please. bee
Logged
patook
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 117


Location: Denton,Texas


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2009, 01:11:04 AM »

A swarm will act a lot like a package of bees. They are going to need to first draw comb and start laying brood. Much depends on the size of the swarm and where you live (your profile says you are lost). However, unless you have a lot of bees and a strong fall flow, I would think it would be unlikely to get honey off a swarm this season. Feeding them will help them draw out comb and give them a head start. So would giving them comb and/or brood.


Logged

bailey
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 874


Location: RACELAND LA


« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2009, 01:29:57 AM »

any hive that i can get before july and that has a good queen  can have a super of honey in the fall.
we get a good fall flow as long as we get a little rain. but i live in the south part of louisiana.
we can wear shorts in november quite often.

bailey
Logged

most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2009, 10:07:43 PM »

The general rule of thumb is not to expect a honey crop for the beekeeper the first year.  The 1st year should be spent getting to know the bees a bit and attempting to insure that they have sufficient honey stores to survive winter.

But with that said, it is possible to get a honey crop the 1st year if it is a large swarm or package, if fed syrup to help build combs but not enough to make them backfill the broodchamber and cause them to swarm.  A good heavy honey flow can make a difference as can the proliferation of the queen, more brood makes more bees which makes more honey.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Bee Whisper82
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 73


Location: Knoxville TN


« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 12:51:21 PM »

How much honey do the girls need to survive the winter some say 60 to 70lb. but really how much?
Logged
NasalSponge
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 271


Location: OKC


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 03:51:23 PM »

That depends again on location, type of bees, and weather. Russians go into winter with smaller clusters and therefore use less stores whereas Italians go into winter with lots-o-bees and eat alot more.
Logged

Bee Whisper82
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 73


Location: Knoxville TN


« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 09:50:04 PM »

If I put a pic on here is there any way that you could tell me what type of bees I have.  I live in southwest of Virginia and sometimes it gets down to single digits here during the winter.

« Last Edit: May 21, 2009, 09:13:09 PM by Bee Whisper82 » Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2009, 11:17:19 PM »

It gets down to single digits here in the PNW as well.  Speaking Italians, as that is what most recommondations are based on because they were so widely used for so long. 
For overwintering the conventional wisdom is 70-80 lbs of honey stored in the brood boxes (I have 3 mediums).  I  prefer to have my bees go into winter in a honey bound condition and showing some burr combs between the boxes of frames. 
With Russians and Carnies I think 50-60 lbs will accomplish the same survival rate as 70-80 does for Italians.  I've over wintered both in a double stacked 5 frame medium nuc without trouble.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
CBEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 343

Location: Northern Kentucky


« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2009, 12:48:17 PM »

I hope mine does  grin
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.177 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page December 07, 2014, 12:19:18 AM