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Author Topic: Tomato Plant  (Read 4489 times)
Irwin
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« on: May 16, 2009, 01:20:09 PM »

The bottom leaf's of my tomato plant's are turning yellow they are about a foot tall is this normal.
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Bee Happy
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2009, 05:46:25 PM »

Could be a nitrogen deficiency. My soil is horrid here, so I have to fertilize and fertilize and fertilize.
depending what you want to fertilize with, you could add on some (not too much) composted manure to help fix the problem.
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Natalie
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2009, 09:39:42 PM »

It could be a nitrogen deficiency, I put used coffee grounds around my tomato plants to fix that.
Starbucks saves all their used coffee grounds and puts them back into the bags the beans came in and puts a sticker on the bag explaining how to use them in the garden.
They give them out on a first come first serve basis so if you have one near you check them out.
Or if you drink coffee just spread the grounds in the garden.
They are also great for killing slugs.
The caffeine is absorbed through their slimy little "feet" and kills them.
I also crush up egg shells and put those in the soil around the plants when they need more calcium.
It could also be that the plants are being overwatered when they have yellow leaves.
Just be careful of over fertilizing because you can end up with tons of foliage but no fruit.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2009, 12:36:57 AM »

Mine have the same thing, we have had a lot more rain here than normal though.
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c10250
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« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2009, 10:38:36 AM »

Sounds to me like the leaves closest to the bottom of the plant are too wet.  Are they touching the ground? Have you had a lot of rain and cool weather?  I would try a fungicide (sp?).  Also, try to keep them dry.  Don't get them wet when watering.

I'm no expert, but I have been keeping tomatoes for 15 years now.  I don't think it's nigrogen deficiency.  Nitrogen deficiency results in poor leaf growth AFIK. I would lean towards them being wet and cool all the time.
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Bodo
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« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2009, 02:31:09 PM »

I second the too wet situation.  Mine do that if they touch the ground. Just trim the offending leaves and move on.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2009, 05:55:47 PM »

Sounds to me like the leaves closest to the bottom of the plant are too wet.  Are they touching the ground? Have you had a lot of rain and cool weather?  I would try a fungicide (sp?).  Also, try to keep them dry.  Don't get them wet when watering.

No, mine are well off the ground, and it's all the leaves, not just the bottom ones... and I haven't yet watered them this year, it won't stop raining long enough for it to be necessary.  I think the longest we've gone without rain this year has been around 2 days.  Those were a nice two days.

I'm no expert, but I have been keeping tomatoes for 15 years now.  I don't think it's nigrogen deficiency.  Nitrogen deficiency results in poor leaf growth AFIK. I would lean towards them being wet and cool all the time.

That could be... like I said, we haven't had a break in the rain, so they've not had a chance to dry out... though temps have been about right for them (80's day 60's night).
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Irwin
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« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2009, 09:05:12 AM »

It could be a nitrogen deficiency, I put used coffee grounds around my tomato plants to fix that.
Starbucks saves all their used coffee grounds and puts them back into the bags the beans came in and puts a sticker on the bag explaining how to use them in the garden.
They give them out on a first come first serve basis so if you have one near you check them out.
Or if you drink coffee just spread the grounds in the garden.
They are also great for killing slugs.
The caffeine is absorbed through their slimy little "feet" and kills them.
I also crush up egg shells and put those in the soil around the plants when they need more calcium.
It could also be that the plants are being overwatered when they have yellow leaves.
Just be careful of over fertilizing because you can end up with tons of foliage but no fruit.
OK how much coffee grounds do I put on them. Buy the way they are in 5 gallon bucket's
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Natalie
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2009, 01:03:43 PM »

I just spread an inch or so around them on the soil, I don't put it directly on the plants.
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Keith13
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« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2009, 02:10:16 PM »

Irwin also if when it rains the water splashes dirt up onto the leaves it can cause a fungus as well

Keith
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doak
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« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2009, 11:07:14 PM »

Get a small bag, )5 to 10) pounds, each of , bone meal and cotton seed meal. Scrounge up about the same amount of ashes. mix even amounts of each together. apply about 1/2 cup about 6 to 8 inches away from the plant in a circle around the plant. Work into the soil.
Although you say you have had plenty rain, get a box of Miracle-Gro. Follow the directions on package. If you are into none chemical stuff, ask the garden store for some all organic plant food.
get a high, count, like 6-8-6, 5-10-10 or 6-12-12
You need something quick acting. The cotton seed meal and bone meal will have a longer slower release, but go ahead and use it.
You can also trim the lower limbs, if they are ready to shed any how, just a little down pressure on the limb right next to the plant. with a little experince it should not take long to get the hang fof it.

Fot those who don't know, when you start to get fruit and it developes rot, sprinkle a table spoon of epson salts around the plant in a circle same as above.

If you get the green horn worm, leave the ones that have the little white eggs on their back, do not destory these. They are parcitic fly eggs that feed on the worms.
Any more ?'s doak rolleyes Smiley
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doak
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« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2009, 11:48:20 PM »

I think the only time you want to be careful about getting the leaves wet when watering is in mid day hot sun. in nature no part of the plant dodges the rain.

My theory, You have had so much rain it has leached your soil of nutrients to the point the plants cannot access the nutrients. put any and every thing you can find, as long as you don't over do it.
coffee grounds, like was mentioned above. Tea leaves. fish meal. apply more potash and phosphorus than nitrogen.  leave out the 6-8-6. go with something like 5-10-10 or 6-12-12.
The composted manure is a good idea. no fresh stuff. the only exception to that is rabbit droppings, they can go strait from peter bunny.
No fresh sawdust or wood chips, that eats up your nitrogen during decomposition.

If you can come with some composted cow or horse manure, get a burlap bag or
a sand bag will do. fill with about as much as would half fill a five gal bucket. put the bag with the manure in it, in the bucket and fill with water. In 24 hours you have about 3 to 4 gallons of manure tea. put the bag into another bucket and fill with water. If you need that much. once you have leached the manure two or three times you can then work the manure into the ground for humus. The manure tea will take effect quicker than just applying the manure to the ground.
Give each plant about a pint each, about every 5 to 7 days. you will see a difference in a week if this is the only thing you do. But do more, Get some more nutrient producing material in the ground.
night folks, doak.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2009, 03:07:33 AM »

Fot those who don't know, when you start to get fruit and it developes rot, sprinkle a table spoon of epson salts around the plant in a circle same as above.

What does epson salt do for blossom end rot?  I thought that blossom end rot was the result of underwatering or lack of calcium... but I don't see how salt would correct that.  Maybe it does something else like killing the fungi?
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Natalie
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« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2009, 09:11:11 AM »


Epsom salts are a naturally occurring mineral. They were first discovered in Epsom, England, where they got their name. You can find cartons of Epsom salt in drug stores and groceries, either in with the laxatives or the sore muscle section.

What do Epsom Salts do for Plants?
Epsom salts contain hydrated magnesium sulfate, two elements crucial to plant growth.
Sulfur (13%) is crucial to the inner workings of plants, but it is almost never lacking in the soil, thanks in part to synthetic fertilizers and acid rain.

Magnesium (10%) can become scarce in soil, usually because of erosion or depletion of the top soil or a pH imbalance. Some plants, like lettuce and spinach, don’t mind going without magnesium. Others may exhibit symptoms like leaf curing, stunted growth, that could be attributed to more than one cause. Magnesium deficiency has even been blamed as a cause for biter tomatoes.
In general, magnesium plays a role in strengthening the plant cell walls, allowing the plant to take in the nutrients it needs. It also aids in seed germination, photosynthesis and in the formation of fruits and seeds.


Do Epsom Salts Really Help Plants Grow Better?
Researchers have never been terribly impressed with the effects of Epsom salts on plants. Gardeners are a different story and the use of Epsom salts is a gardening tip passed down for generations. While many gardeners simply toss in a handful of Epsom salts at planting time, it really is wiser to test your soil first. Epsom salts are not going to cure an extreme magnesium deficiency. However, experienced gardeners have been swearing by Epsom salts for years, and folk wisdom is often ahead of scientific study. The three plants that benefit most from an application of magnesium in the form of Epsom Salts are: Tomatoes, Peppers and Roses

Epsom Salts for Tomatoes and Peppers
Tomatoes and peppers may show signs of magnesium deficiency late in the season, when their leaves begin to yellow between the leaf veins and fruit production decreases. Whether you will get more and/or larger fruits will depend on many things in addition to using Epsom salts, but using them does seem to have some benefit.

Either mix in 1 T. of Epsom salts into the soil at the bottom of the planting hole when setting out transplants or mix the 1 T. in a gallon of water and water the seedling.

Follow-up with a foliar spray of 1T. per gallon of water when the plants start to flower and again when the young fruits start to form. Try it on a few plants and see if you can tell the difference as the season goes along.

Don’t worry about being exact as to when you apply the Epsom salts. This is a home gardening remedy and there are as many formulas as there are home gardens. Some gardeners only add Epsom salts at planting time. Others like to water or foliar feed with Epsom salts every other week. In this case I’d recommend a more dilute solution, mixing only 1 t. of salts per gallon of water. And some gardeners simply use the Epsom salts when they remember. It’s all good.
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doak
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« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2009, 01:18:24 PM »

Natalie, Thanks for helping me out. :)doak
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Natalie
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« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2009, 02:10:44 PM »

No Problem Wink
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Bodo
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« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2009, 02:50:46 PM »

So, am I wrong in thinking that end rot is caused by Ca (calcium) deficiency and that epsom salts won't help that problem?
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Irwin
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« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2009, 09:00:14 AM »

Thank's all for your help  Smiley
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reinbeau
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« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2009, 07:38:46 AM »

So, am I wrong in thinking that end rot is caused by Ca (calcium) deficiency and that epsom salts won't help that problem?
Yes, you are wrong, Epsom salts do help with BER.  The magnesium helps with the calcium uptake (read the article Natalie posted).
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2009, 12:03:56 PM »

So, am I wrong in thinking that end rot is caused by Ca (calcium) deficiency and that epsom salts won't help that problem?
Yes, you are wrong, Epsom salts do help with BER.  The magnesium helps with the calcium uptake (read the article Natalie posted).

Well I read the article she posted, but it didn't say anything about magnesium helping specifically with calcium uptake... it did say nutrients in general, but that does not necessarily mean calcium, especially if calcium in the soil has been depleted.

I even did a keyword search just to make sure I wasn't missing anything... didn't find the word calcium in that post at all and I didn't see any links to any external articles she posted either.
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