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Author Topic: Baby crow followed me home.  (Read 5159 times)
Cockatoo
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« on: May 14, 2009, 02:14:08 PM »

Ugh.
A pair of hawks tore apart it's nest and this is the surviving chick.
Now I gotta raise him and let him go.
I suppose it's a sacred honor bestowed to care for on of the Great Spirits favorites.




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dragonfly
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2009, 03:17:38 PM »

What happened to the parent crows, and is the chick able to fly yet? He/she looks almost ready for fledging from what I can see.

Your story tells me why I always see the crows here harrassing owls and hawks. I didn't realize that hawks would tear up the nests of crows.
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Cockatoo
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2009, 03:31:56 PM »

He can't fly at all.
He's probably 2 weeks from fledging.
Hit tail feathers are just coming in and his wings are not strong yet.
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dragonfly
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2009, 11:11:19 PM »

Wow, really interesting story. My hat's off to you for rehabbing (or raising) him. What do you have to do to insure he stays "wild" and doesn't become domesticated? Who teaches him to eat in the wild in the absence of his parents? I've never known anyone who raises and releases wild birds.
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2009, 12:10:25 AM »

Make him a pet and teach him to talk!!!

My grampa had a pet crow when he was younger.  Pretty tame but from the stories it sounded like a bit of a pest.

Rick
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Rick
G3farms
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2009, 06:55:41 AM »

He would make a good pet but they are master theives and will steal anything that catches their eye. I have heard that to make them talk you have to split their tounge.

That's a good find I think, even though crow hunting is my favorite. They have got to be one of, if not the smartest bird around.

Good luck with him.

G3
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those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
Cockatoo
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2009, 09:14:41 AM »

This will be the second one I've had so it's rumored.
Yes they are mischievous, and will take car keys and decorate their favorite hiding spot with them.
Like up on the book case.  grin
The first crow I had for 2 years and a friend kept pestering me for him and I finally gave in and let the crow adopt him.
Mike has had Gandolf for about 12 years now.


Now to clear up any ignorance on making crows or any other intelligent bird talk.
The splitting of the tongue is complete BS. I don't know how this BS gets spread but please stop it when you hear it.
A bird has a syrinx. Specialized muscles, called syringeal muscles, control the syrinx. A bird can vary its sounds in two ways. It can manipulate its syringeal muscles to alter the tension and position of the membranes, thus raising or lowering the pitch (frequency of vibration) of a sound. A bird can also increase or decrease the flow of air pressure from its lungs, thus making a sound louder or softer, and sometimes affecting the pitch as well.
So some intelligent birds will imitate sounds around them and actually learn our language.
All animals have cognitive though and reasoning.
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Natalie
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2009, 10:12:00 AM »

Glad you are helping the little one out.
Crows and hawks are natural enemies. I like having crows around because they harrass the hawks who try to snatch my hens.
I have seen the crows and hawks going at it in the sky, the crows will keep circling them,diving at them and close in on them until the hawks take off.
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Keith13
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2009, 10:16:04 AM »

Natalie the crows don't mess with your chicks? Seems either way hawks or crows are bad news for your chickens huh

Keith
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Cockatoo
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2009, 10:44:18 AM »

The crow won't take a full grown hen.
The hawk will.
The crow will only try to take a chick and eggs. And will back down from a momma hen.
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G3farms
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2009, 10:49:54 AM »

Thanks for the education on the crows talking cockatoo, I had only heard that but did not know.

I know the crows aroound here are sure death on the hawks and owls. I believe the crows are kind of lazy and will take the open opertunity (sp?) for easy pickins, but will fight when they have too.

I still like to hunt them though, they are very smart and that makes the hunt even harder.

G3
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
Cockatoo
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« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2009, 12:47:39 PM »

Crows are especially sacred to me.
I don't kill anything without reason or purpose. Especially something defenseless.
To kill anything to watch it fall, leaves one with a cold black soul.

I do hunt but I take the animals life with respect, reverence and forgiveness.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2009, 01:47:18 PM by Cockatoo » Logged

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annette
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« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2009, 01:01:37 PM »

I like your attitude about life Cockatoo. To hold it sacred and special, a true gift to receive this life.

I am glad you dispelled the idea of cutting the tongue on the bird. That sounded horrible to me.
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Natalie
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« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2009, 01:39:46 PM »

Natalie the crows don't mess with your chicks? Seems either way hawks or crows are bad news for your chickens huh

Keith

A crow would steal a chick but I would never have chicks out in the yard anyway. Only the hens get to free range and the hawks are a real problem for them.
The chicks stay in an enclosed pen outside until they are 3 months old.
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c10250
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« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2009, 01:41:53 PM »

Crows make great pets!  I fed my baby crow canned dog food.  Make sure he has some very small stones/pebbles for his gizzard. I never fed them to my crow, but he did take it upon himself to eat them.
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poka-bee
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« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2009, 10:28:13 PM »

Cockatoo, I love your attitude.  I have raised & released many wild birds, 2 of them crows. They sure can get into trouble though, so curious & smart. If you don't handle em just to feed & give them many different types of food they will adapt back to the wild, specially if you let em go when there are plenty of berries, bugs & whatever to get.  I always know when the hawks are around cause the crows mob em! 20-30 crows will be making a racket following the poor hawk wherever it goes till it is out of their range.  They will take ducklings & chicks, fly up & drop em on a rock or the ground & pick em back up to eat..UGH!  J
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2009, 12:13:33 AM »

Is it a crow or a raven?  I like ravens but don't care at all for crows.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2009, 12:19:17 AM »

Crows are especially sacred to me.
I don't kill anything without reason or purpose. Especially something defenseless.
To kill anything to watch it fall, leaves one with a cold black soul.

I do hunt but I take the animals life with respect, reverence and forgiveness.

What's the difference?  I mean, to me, I've always heard, eat what you kill... and that's the way I've tried to live, but if you're hunting for sport and not food, what difference does it make wheather you're jovial about the kill or reverent about it?
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lenape13
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« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2009, 08:21:34 AM »

The difference is that, to some of us, especially those who follow our native american beliefs, is that ALL life is sacred.  Killing for sport, or just to watch something die is a BIG No-No.  One is only to kill to eat, and then you are to use everything you can of that animal, waste nothing, out of respect for that animal.  Some individuals and cultures have taboos against killing certain animals due to specific spiritual roles, etc.  For example, I am Lenape, Turtle Clan.  Rabbits and groundhogs are sacred animals, hence no killing or eating.  As I am Turtle Clan, no turtle killing...  My totem is the wolf, which uses crows and ravens for spotters and crows as lookouts and early warning systems, so no killing of these animals either.  I realize that to some, these beliefs seem odd and out-dated, but to many people, these are the rules we live our lives by.  Who's right?  I don't know, but I'm sure we'll all find out someday.... grin
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2009, 09:46:07 AM »

The difference is that, to some of us, especially those who follow our native american beliefs, is that ALL life is sacred.  Killing for sport, or just to watch something die is a BIG No-No.  One is only to kill to eat, and then you are to use everything you can of that animal, waste nothing, out of respect for that animal.  Some individuals and cultures have taboos against killing certain animals due to specific spiritual roles, etc.  For example, I am Lenape, Turtle Clan.  Rabbits and groundhogs are sacred animals, hence no killing or eating.  As I am Turtle Clan, no turtle killing...  My totem is the wolf, which uses crows and ravens for spotters and crows as lookouts and early warning systems, so no killing of these animals either.  I realize that to some, these beliefs seem odd and out-dated, but to many people, these are the rules we live our lives by.  Who's right?  I don't know, but I'm sure we'll all find out someday.... grin

Ok, so you are killing to eat (or use for something else)... when you kill.
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lenape13
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« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2009, 10:04:51 AM »

Only to eat.  Before going out to hunt there are rituals and prayers, and immediately after the kill, we offer prayers thanking the animal for allowing itself to be killed so that we may continue to live.  I realize this may seem hypocritical to many, but it's just our way.  Once the animal is killed, we use as much of it as possible, wasting little, out of respect for it's life, and the loss of it.  For example, meat is eaten, hide is used for leather for clothing, sinew for thread, bones for tools, hooves for glue and rattles (for ceremony).  Even the eyes can be used as the fluid in the eyes makes a  most wonderful varnish... Horns for handles for knives, etc.  Granted, most people, even many natives, don't follow these guidelines.  Many, like myself, still follow the traditional ways.  I make no judgements on the ways of others, this is just the path some of us follow.
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Natalie
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« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2009, 12:58:26 PM »

I don't think its hypocritical at all. I have more respect for someone that hunts using your methods than most others.
I do not believe in hunting for sport and taking a life in such a frivolous manner.
I think its great and its important that you and others continue the traditions of your ancestors or your culture would be lost and that would be a great loss.
I love to hear about the native american culture, its very interesting.
Actually, my sisters are married to brothers that are native american, mescalero apache. They were put into the system as children and seperated at that point, found each other years later and ended up marrying my sisters.
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lenape13
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« Reply #22 on: May 22, 2009, 04:37:26 PM »

Small world, isn't it?
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Cockatoo
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« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2009, 12:20:01 PM »

Crows are especially sacred to me.
I don't kill anything without reason or purpose. Especially something defenseless.
To kill anything to watch it fall, leaves one with a cold black soul.

I do hunt but I take the animals life with respect, reverence and forgiveness.

What's the difference?  I mean, to me, I've always heard, eat what you kill... and that's the way I've tried to live, but if you're hunting for sport and not food, what difference does it make wheather you're jovial about the kill or reverent about it?

I don't hunt for sport.
Ever.
I won't pass judgment on those who kill for sport.
But they are empty inside and I avoid them.
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SgtMaj
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« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2009, 12:29:07 AM »

I won't pass judgment on those who kill for sport.
But they are empty inside and I avoid them.

Well as long as you're not passing judgement on them... cheesy
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Cockatoo
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« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2009, 07:50:10 AM »

 rolleyes
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