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Author Topic: Adding A Capped Queen Cell  (Read 1507 times)
BoBn
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« on: May 05, 2009, 11:08:56 AM »

I installed 2 packages on April 28.  One package has a queen and eggs.  The second one is queenless.  I can tell by the behavior.

I also have strong hive in 2 deeps and 2 mediums that had started building swarm cells.  The several that I saw were not yet capped but had young larvae in them on May 3rd.  On May 3rd, I removed the 3 year old queen and five frames of bees, comb, honey, pollen and emerging brood and put them in a new location.

I plan on taking a frame with swarm cells from the old hive and placing it into my queenless package hive.   I would still be leaving swarm cells behind for the old hive.

I figure that some of them may be capped by this weekend or a few days sooner.  How long should I wait after they are capped before transfering them to the package?   

Thanks
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asprince
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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2009, 06:21:36 PM »

BoBn, I see no flaws with your plan, sounds text book. But, I am not as experienced as others on the forum. I would transfer the queen cells as soon as they are capped.

Good Luck,

Steve
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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2009, 10:41:49 PM »

sounds like you done this before  grin  Wink ,  very good plan, glad to see you found the queen and moved her before she left. if you had some nuc boxes you could move a couple frames of bee's with a cell on one and start another. 
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BoBn
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2009, 08:00:48 PM »

On May 3rd, I removed the 3 year old queen and five frames of bees, comb, honey, pollen and emerging brood and put them in a new location.

I plan on taking a frame with swarm cells from the old hive and placing it into my queenless package hive.   I would still be leaving swarm cells behind for the old hive.

I took out a frame with swarm cells as planned, and put into the queenless package hive on May 7.   The strange thing is that I saw another laying queen in the hive that I removed the queen from.   rolleyes 
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"Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch toward uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one-half the world fools and the other half hypocrites."
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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2009, 02:33:23 AM »

I was at a Dewy Caren lives nearby my in Oregon and spoke at the bee school my chapter put on.  In that he said that they were doing a study using queenlessness as a mite controll method.  He observed that after they removed the queens from colonies and then went back to look for queen sign, about 20% still had a queen in them.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2009, 10:04:14 PM »

I was at a Dewy Caren lives nearby my in Oregon and spoke at the bee school my chapter put on.  In that he said that they were doing a study using queenlessness as a mite controll method.  He observed that after they removed the queens from colonies and then went back to look for queen sign, about 20% still had a queen in them.

Mid-summer splits achieves the same objective of a brood dearth that disrupts the varroa reproduction cycle.  Why do all the extra work of doing queenless hives when a much simpler and easier implimented method already exists?  On top of that, I've noticed that bees with Russian genetics have a tendency to induce a brood dearth of their own after a large honey flow.
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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2009, 10:26:41 PM »

I was at a Dewy Caren lives nearby my in Oregon and spoke at the bee school my chapter put on.  In that he said that they were doing a study using queenlessness as a mite controll method.  He observed that after they removed the queens from colonies and then went back to look for queen sign, about 20% still had a queen in them.

 On top of that, I've noticed that bees with Russian genetics have a tendency to induce a brood dearth of their own after a large honey flow.

very true, they stop raising brood as soon as the flow stops
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