Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
November 23, 2014, 07:48:40 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Are bald-faced hornets a problem?  (Read 4508 times)
Irwin
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2343


Location: Lakeside OR

howdy all


« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2009, 01:52:51 PM »

They'll set up a nest somewhere else nearby.  Chances are that you have had a nest in your vicinity before this year.

yeah, there is a good chance they may have been in some thick pine trees nearby, and I wouldn't care if they were there again... but right under the eves by the front door was a little too close.

I did still try to kill it anyway, but missed and it flew off and didn't return.
Your lucky there Sarge every time I miss I get stung and they one heck of a sting Cry Cry Cry But when they stop to sting you can get them Smiley
Logged

Fight organized crime!  Re-elect no one.
wildwoodflowerfarm
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2009, 03:04:29 PM »

The advice to live and let live with hornets is ok as long as they are not around your living or working area but if they are anywhere that people occupy they need to be removed as quickly as possible.  As an ER nurse I can tell you that hornet stings in particular are dangerous.  Both  hornets and yellow jackets sting in mass, hornets more so than the jackets.  While one  sting hurts but is  tolerable, multiple stings can seriously affect a person and I have had patients die from shock with a multi sting attack.  Not from allergic shock mind you but from the severity of the injury.  Also, use a long distance means of removal.  A bee vac might work in a colder area but here in the deep South would be asking for trouble.  High heat and humidity here seem to make the boogers worse.
Logged
Natalie
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1478

Location: Weymouth, Massachusetts


« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2009, 04:20:46 PM »

I really need to get familiar with these different insects so I know what I am seeing when I am outside.
There was a huge and I mean huge bee(?) in my car the other day.
My husband caught it in a jar to show it to me.
It had a yellow or white spot on the front of its head and was mostly black but had very faint yellow bands.
It looked like that thing could do serious damage.
Logged
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2009, 08:31:47 PM »

I really need to get familiar with these different insects so I know what I am seeing when I am outside.
There was a huge and I mean huge bee(?) in my car the other day.
My husband caught it in a jar to show it to me.
It had a yellow or white spot on the front of its head and was mostly black but had very faint yellow bands.
It looked like that thing could do serious damage.


Sounds like a bald-faced hornet to me:

Logged
TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #24 on: May 20, 2009, 09:07:12 PM »

was it the European hornet? they are huge, I find them here now more thn other years, they seem to not be a pest to hives yet but from reading they can be bad....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_hornet
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
dirtyanklebeekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 62

Location: Casar, NC


WWW
« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2009, 09:21:18 PM »

I have seen a few hornets this year and they will fly right down to the entrance of a hive and carry a bee away. On occasion I will see three or four bees attack the hornet and take it down. I cannot find their nest though. any tips on how to track them down?
Logged

Damien
Natalie
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1478

Location: Weymouth, Massachusetts


« Reply #26 on: May 20, 2009, 09:48:26 PM »

Its almost like in between those two types of pictures you guys posted.
I have never seen such a huge bee but it did have that spot on its face, just not as much coloring as the picture of the baldface hornet.
I wish I had thought to take a picture of it.
Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5314


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2009, 10:56:13 PM »

Here are a couple of photos of the hornet I found dead outside the bee hive last summer. The girls got it.



Logged
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2009, 11:20:49 PM »

Natalie,
How about a cicada killer?  They are intimidating and can act aggressive but rarely sting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicada_killer_wasp

There are also waspy looking bugs like horntails.

Rick
Logged

Rick
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #29 on: May 21, 2009, 03:41:56 AM »

I have seen a few hornets this year and they will fly right down to the entrance of a hive and carry a bee away. On occasion I will see three or four bees attack the hornet and take it down. I cannot find their nest though. any tips on how to track them down?

You could try beelining them... just see what direction they fly off in, then move your hive 90 degrees from that direction and see what direction they fly off in again, the intersection of those two lines is where they should be at if they fly straight home like a honey bee does.
Logged
dirtyanklebeekeeper
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 62

Location: Casar, NC


WWW
« Reply #30 on: May 21, 2009, 06:37:30 AM »

Thanks sgtmaj. We will have to try that. Don't want them to get out of hand.
Logged

Damien
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #31 on: May 21, 2009, 06:49:36 AM »

I see them every summer.  They are stalkers of the bees and carry live bees off to feed their young.  I haven't ever killed one but I have seen the bees ball them like Annette said. 

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2006/07/attack-of-bee-eater_16.html

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2006/07/death-to-intruder_12.html

Linda T in Atlanta where rain is here (Yay!) but it is interfering with honey production because the bees can't fly for days
« Last Edit: May 21, 2009, 07:05:17 AM by tillie » Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Bee Whisper82
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 73


Location: Knoxville TN


« Reply #32 on: May 21, 2009, 03:23:41 PM »

I can't believe that other bee will feed on honeybees in the first place. Honeybees don't do that. Sad
« Last Edit: May 21, 2009, 03:42:17 PM by Bee Whisper82 » Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5314


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2009, 03:26:03 PM »

I always meant to tell you Linda that I just adore that photo of the 2 bees standing next to the dead hornet.  Like they are posing with the kill. I also love how you got the photos of them dragging away that same hornet.  Just wonderful.

Annette
Logged
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2009, 08:20:56 AM »

Quote
I can't believe that other bee will feed on honeybees

The bald-faced hornet is a hornet - not a bee -

Linda T in the beautiful n. Georgia mountains where the blackberry is still full of blooms and bees
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.611 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page October 30, 2014, 09:43:09 AM