Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Feeding New Bees  (Read 750 times)

Offline JimRB

  • New Bee
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Gender: Male
Feeding New Bees
« on: May 04, 2009, 12:06:57 AM »
This past weekend, I received my first shipment of bees. After placing them in the two waiting hives, I put a quart canning jar filled with 1:1 sugar/water mixture on top of the feeder holes on each hive.The lids for the jars, ordered from a beekeeping supply, came pierced with about twenty tiny holes. The jars on the hives are now empty, after being on the hives less than 24 hrs. Are there too many holes in the lids that allowed the sugar syrup to drain too quickly, and if so, should I try using other lids with only a couple of tiny holes that I will make myself?
Thanks for any suggestions that you have.
-Jim

Offline Bobb

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 68
  • Gender: Male
    • Honey Hive Farms
Re: Feeding New Bees
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2009, 12:56:57 AM »
My new hives, 2nd week., are taking 3 quart jars of 1 to 1 every 2 days. (Where is Hopelessly Lost????)
"Power, especially overgrown power, whets the ambition and sets all the wits to work to enlarge it. Therefore, encroachments on peoples liberties are not generally made all at once, but so gradually as hardly to be perceived by the less watchful; and all plastered over, it may be, with such plausible pretenses, that before they are aware of the snare, they are taken and can not disentangle themselves."

Samuel Webster
Massachusetts 1777

Offline RayMarler

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 520
  • Gender: Male
Re: Feeding New Bees
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2009, 12:59:18 AM »
Are the lids inside an empty box with lid on top? If the sun hits the jars, it increase the heat and pressure and pushes the syrup out too quickly into the hive.
Sitting in the shade, drinking lemon aid.
Enjoying the breeze while counting the bees.

Offline TimLa

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 102
  • Gender: Male
Re: Feeding New Bees
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2009, 04:19:14 AM »
Without knowing where you are located, it's hard to say.  I've seen one of my hives drink 1/4 - 1/2 gallon a day last year. They did that for several weeks until the flow got going.

Ray had a good question - if the jars are warming and cooling, it'll force (some) syrup out, but not the whole jar in a day, depending on where you are.

Check the inside of the hives for leaking syrup.

Let us know where you are.

Keep feeding.

-T
Some days you just want to line them all up and start asking questions.

Offline Two Bees

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 614
  • Gender: Male
Re: Feeding New Bees
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2009, 08:50:34 AM »
Taking a quart in one day by a new package is not unusual.  As mentioned above, my two packages installed last year were going through a gallon jar of syrup in about 2 1/2 to 3 days.  I was making a run to the store for sugar at least once per week and getting strange looks at the checkout.

Unless the holes in the lids are to large, the syrup doesn't drip out after it builds up a suction inside the jar.  Some dripping is normal once you initially invert the jar.  But that's ok as well.

The first day I installed my packages last year, I had holes way too big in the lids and made a nice 8-10 inch puddle of syrup on the solid bottom board.  Came back the next day to make sure that syrup wasn't running out of the front of the hive and the bees had cleaned it up.  Cleaned it up so well that I wasn't sure that any syrup had ever been spilled!
"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.

Offline JimRB

  • New Bee
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Gender: Male
Re: Feeding New Bees
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2009, 10:05:41 AM »
Thanks for the replies. We are located in MO, about an hour from Kansas City.
We are looking forward to beekeeping and just wanted to be sure that we weren't 'drowning' the new bees with sugar syrup their first day in our hives.