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Author Topic: Greetings from Piedmont of NC  (Read 1140 times)
beegenerous
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Location: Madison, North Carolina USA


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« on: May 03, 2009, 02:11:55 PM »

Hello All;

Just a little about myself.

My name is Dana Reynolds ( a guy ); I live in Madison, NC. I worked with bees for about 5 years and got out of it about 10 years ago when the only black bear to have been in this area for umpteen years totally destroyed my hives. Since then I have had the urge to get back into this and now with a 13 year old son that needs to get into something neat; I thought I would give it another try.
I am refurbishing my old hives, building new ones and putting frames together today. I forgot how much fun that was...joke Smiley
I have a friend that has about 30 hives and has sold me 2; but his are in such bad shape to try and move I decided to build and repair my old ones and then do the transfer of frames late one evening and move them the next evening. I do not want to have a hive body fall apart in my hands...yikes

 I have been reading a lot and have found there are more problems with hive management now than when I did it; and I know the hives I am getting really need a lot of work, treatments, etc. so this will be a lot more than when I got started last time and just bought healthy nucs; but maybe I can save this little ladies as right now I do not think they are getting the attention they need.

I really look forward to reading and getting good advise from the pros on here; and I am thankful this forum is here.
Most Respectfully;

Dana
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Dana M. Reynolds, csmg
asprince
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« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2009, 05:22:05 PM »

Welcome beegenerous. Beekeeping is a great family project, good that you have your son involved. You are wise to transfer them to a sturdy hive. It is no fun when a hive comes apart during a move. I know from experience.

Welcome, Steve
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1reb
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« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2009, 06:16:52 PM »

Hello and Welcome Dana
There is alot of great information on the forum !!
The members here are willing help and answer your questions, all you need to do is to ask
Johnny
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cundald
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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2009, 11:53:55 PM »

Hello & welcome, Dana

Good luck on the transfer and move.  Beekeeping is great when is a family thing.

You may check out local beekeeping association for Rockingham County and
the “North Carolina State Beekeepers Association” both can be very helpful.

Here is a link to the state web page http://www.ncbeekeepers.org/

Cundald
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The first step in the acquisition of wisdom is silence, the second listening, the third memory, the fourth practice, the fifth teaching others.
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beegenerous
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2009, 03:13:54 PM »

Thanks Guys;

I was a member of the county beekeepers assoc. back when and joined up the family this time.
I have already seen a weath of info on this forum already and I know so much more is yet to come. I am not bashful and will ask tons of questions.

Thank you again you make a person feel very welcome.

Most Respectfully;

Dana
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Dana M. Reynolds, csmg
iddee
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2009, 06:58:17 PM »

Welcome....Along with your county club, you are close enough to attend a meeting now and then in Forsyth and Guilford counties. Both have well over a hundred members and many of your club members are also members there.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2009, 10:44:09 PM »

Dana, welcome to our forum, glad you found us.  You have been held under the spell of the honeybee, you know that.  It is wonderful that you are going to become involved again, but this time with you fine young Son, wonderful.

THis will be a place where you can do lots more learning, helping others learn, a place to tell your stories, tales and experiences.  It will be a wonderful tool for you and your Son.  STick around.

Something you said has caused a little concern.  It is about the transfer of bee frames at night.  I would put a question out into the other areas of the forum.  In my mind's eye, moving or transferring frames at night, when it is dark, when alll the bees are home would not be a good idea.  You could do it late in the day, or during the day when many of the bees are out.  The bee box could be beside the original box and I don't think you would have too much trouble with the bee orienting to the new box.  Ask the question, please, I would love to hear answers from ones that are far more experienced with this manouveur.  Have that wonderful day, life and health. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
beegenerous
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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2009, 09:14:20 AM »

Hi Cindi;

Thanks for the warm welcome from all of you.

This is what I am planning and I will give a little more detail this time.

I have a friend that is selling me 2 hives. The hives in question are old and in very poor condition as to the point they will fall apart if moved. I was planning on taking my 2 restored old hives to the location that afternoon; still fairly early in the day say around 3 pm and I will transfer the racks to the new hive bodies. I will then wait until the next evening late around 7 pm and seal up the hive and transfer them about 4 miles away to my location.

If any of this sounds wrong please advise me to the right direction. This will also give me a chance to inspect the hives a little better before I put down the cash. As my thinking is; if the hive bodies are in that condition what condition are the bees in???

Thank you all for being concerned and so very thoughtful and helpful.

Most Respectfully;

Dana
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Dana M. Reynolds, csmg
Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2009, 11:04:09 AM »

Dana, ok, you have shed a different light on the subject and I think your plan would work well.  I thought that you wanted to transfer the frames during the darkness -- that would have been a catastrophe of stings, smiling.  Moving the frames as you indicated and then moving the colony the following night after darkness is just fine.  Although, you may find that you do not have to wait until total darkness.  In my area, the bees are mostly all home around sundown.  That gives about one half hour of twilight, if you so chose to move them then.  But darkness is just fine too.  Good luck.  You may also find that the bees are in OK shape, obviously the colonies have been very neglected, but with any luck they are survivor bees and do not have have disease nor parasites, lets hope for the best, but always bear in mind to expect the worst.  You will soon find out what shape the bees are in.  Yay!!!  Have that wonderfully great and awesome day, to love, live and share your life, health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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