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Author Topic: young lady finds a way to kill SHB's  (Read 8163 times)
Grandma_DOG
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« Reply #40 on: January 25, 2010, 03:25:21 AM »

That's my plan, use a slimline CD case with honey and HP.  The problem will be the measuring metric. I don't expect SHB to die in the case, but later out of the case.  So the trick will be measuring effectiveness.

On top of that, trial and error on honey/HP ratios.

Now we just need to know whether it is toxic to the bee and at what level.  If it is non toxic to bees at lethal levels to the shb you can treat without hurting bees.  If toxic to bees then a device has to be made to only allow shb access to the irresistible poisoned bait.
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slaphead
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« Reply #41 on: January 26, 2010, 12:08:02 AM »

You might want to try mixing Oxyclean (sodium percarbonate) with dry pollen and placing it in a container which the SHBs can get into but the bees can't.  Sodium percarbonate generates hydrogen peroxide on contact with water suggesting that once the SHBs ingest it with pollen they should receive a healthy dose directly to their gut.

SH
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catfishbill
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« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2010, 06:45:15 PM »

what about mixing the hp and honey solution in an aj beetle eater.beetles can get in there and bees can't.is it the honey that draws them to it?if so this would work.   thanks bill
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wfuavenger
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« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2010, 08:44:06 PM »

No one in here has reported on the stability of H2O2....


It is not a stable chemical. It wants to turn to water and 02. If you expose it to light, the light (even in your bathroom over the sink) has enough energy to cause the oxygen to break off and bond with another broken molecule. That is why it is in solid brown containers and not see-through. It also says do not shake, for the same reason.

Most likely, long term would consist of you having to add H202 every week. Why? If you read the study, H202 in lower levels acts like crack to a junkie with the beetles.

You might want to try mixing Oxyclean (sodium percarbonate) with dry pollen and placing it in a container which the SHBs can get into but the bees can't.  Sodium percarbonate generates hydrogen peroxide on contact with water suggesting that once the SHBs ingest it with pollen they should receive a healthy dose directly to their gut.

SH


That is a very good idea, with a few exceptions. First off, it will injure you and do the same to you if you get it on you and you sweat or inhale the dust.


I would recommend reading the MSDS on it: http://www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Sodium_percarbonate-9927598
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slaphead
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« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2010, 09:12:41 PM »

You are right that it should be used with care.  That said Sodium Percarbonate has been widely used for many years by both professional and amateur brewers as a "no rinse required" cleaning and sanitizing agent (trade names "One Step" and Easy Clean" I believe).  I'd recommend using gloves to weigh it out and washing away any spills with water.  Simple solutions of sodium percarbonate in water lose all potency within a few days so it may not work if you spiked honey or syrup with it.  If the powder stays dry it retains its potency, that's why I suggest mixing it with dry pollen or pollen substitute.  To sanitize glassware percarbonate is used at the rate of 1 level tablespoon per gallon of water.  With a freshly prepared solution 2 minutes of contact time kills all contaminating microorganisms.  I suspect you'd need something like 1 Tablespoon per cup of dry pollen / substitute to have a rapid impact on SHBs.  The ultimate breakdown products of percarbonate are Sodium carbonate and water (latter after the peroxide has broken down).  These are inert and non-toxic to humans.  Basically you'd need to provide a bait station the SHBs can get into but the bees can't, and bait it with percarbonate plus dry pollen / pollen substitute.  I suspect some of the SHB traps currently on the market could be used for this purpose.

Well that's my 2 cents worth.  We don't have SHB here yet so I'm unable to test this hypothesis.  If someone out there does try it out please let the rest of us know if it works  Smiley

SH
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sarafina
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« Reply #45 on: February 09, 2010, 01:20:26 PM »

You are right that it should be used with care.  That said Sodium Percarbonate has been widely used for many years by both professional and amateur brewers as a "no rinse required" cleaning and sanitizing agent (trade names "One Step" and Easy Clean" I believe).  I'd recommend using gloves to weigh it out and washing away any spills with water.  Simple solutions of sodium percarbonate in water lose all potency within a few days so it may not work if you spiked honey or syrup with it.  If the powder stays dry it retains its potency, that's why I suggest mixing it with dry pollen or pollen substitute.  To sanitize glassware percarbonate is used at the rate of 1 level tablespoon per gallon of water.  With a freshly prepared solution 2 minutes of contact time kills all contaminating microorganisms.  I suspect you'd need something like 1 Tablespoon per cup of dry pollen / substitute to have a rapid impact on SHBs.  The ultimate breakdown products of percarbonate are Sodium carbonate and water (latter after the peroxide has broken down).  These are inert and non-toxic to humans.  Basically you'd need to provide a bait station the SHBs can get into but the bees can't, and bait it with percarbonate plus dry pollen / pollen substitute.  I suspect some of the SHB traps currently on the market could be used for this purpose.

Well that's my 2 cents worth.  We don't have SHB here yet so I'm unable to test this hypothesis.  If someone out there does try it out please let the rest of us know if it works  Smiley

SH

That's interesting - I didn't know One Step was the same chemical in Oxyclean!  I started brewing my own mead last year with my honey and was using One Step for sanitizing my carboys but switched to the liquid Star San because it was cheaper.  I bought some generic OxyClean at the dollar store to soak leftover wine bottles in to removes the labels, which works great btw.  I'm going to check the label on the generic I bought for $1 and if it is the sodium percarbonate, someone is making a killing re-packaging it as One Step!  And I can always use my cheap stuff in a pinch.

As for SHB - I have the nasty buggers and may start thinking of a way to set a trap for them that the bees can't get to.  I use SBB with oil trays and it keeps them at bay, at least.  I have too many trees for full sun but they are in the sunniest part of the yard I have.
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USC Beeman in TN
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« Reply #46 on: March 26, 2010, 08:56:24 AM »

Just built a couple of screened BBs that have a metal tray for oil to tray and kill SHBs.  I also am trying DE in CDs.  Just became a distributor for Perma-Guard who mines and sells probably the best DE anywhere.  So I may put DE in one instead of oil and try a mixture of HB and H Pollen pattie in the other.  Can't hurt.  The bees can't get to it.
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De Colores,
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Cheryl
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« Reply #47 on: April 09, 2010, 11:16:35 PM »

Just built a couple of screened BBs that have a metal tray for oil to tray and kill SHBs.  I also am trying DE in CDs.  Just became a distributor for Perma-Guard who mines and sells probably the best DE anywhere.  So I may put DE in one instead of oil and try a mixture of HB and H Pollen pattie in the other.  Can't hurt.  The bees can't get to it.
How's that working out for you?
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Jahjude
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« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2010, 12:34:27 AM »

WOW Very interesting stream of events,hope the trend never gets broken would really luv to hear the tested results of using H2O2 or sodium percarbonate.....Has anyone recorded success as yet or at a level which requires assistance to make further tests??
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