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Author Topic: TBH's and the small hive beetle  (Read 3213 times)
SlickMick
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« on: February 15, 2009, 07:34:10 AM »

Just wondered how those who have TBH's deal with the SHB or if they dont use the TBH when the shb is prevalent.
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
BjornBee
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2009, 08:20:41 AM »

Nothing changes in regards to SHB as to whether one has a TBH or any other type hive. Some may suggest that different hive designs or equipment options, may eliminate hiding places, etc. But the colony either deals with SHB or they can not cope, based mainly on bee numbers and strength, their ability (genetics), and other factors.

Some of the highest numbers of SHB I have even seen was in cutouts, natural comb built in swarm traps, and other feral colonies. So natural comb, free hanging comb, and other factors play little into whether a hive handles SHB.

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ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2009, 08:51:29 PM »

I'll second to the large numbers of SHB in cutouts and wild comb--full of them!
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Stephen Stewart
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"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
SlickMick
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2009, 07:02:13 AM »

More thoughts on this!

As I understand it, a strong hive that is populated across all its frames and discounting other influencing factors seems to be able to deal with the SHB the best.

I imagine this means that hives with fully drawn comb that is not covered with bees are more at risk to the SHB? I also imagine that this may also apply to hives with partially drawn comb on foundation.

My thoughts are that this risk may be diminished by using TBHs rather than frames using foundation as comb is drawn as and when needed by the hive, leaving space that is not occupied by either bees or foundation and hence no place for the SHB to hide other than in occupied comb or in the corners of the hive.

Comments will be appreciated
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
suprstakr
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2009, 09:18:43 AM »

Sounds logical !  cheesy
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2009, 11:48:18 PM »

SHB feed on pollen or pollen substitutes in the hive.  They will invade a hive that is stressed ([roducing a high amount of alarm phermone) when pollen count is high.  The pollen is as much of a lure as the alarm phermone and strength of hive just matters on how well the hive can deal with the invasion.  Hygenic type bees fend better than non hygenic bees against the SHB.

Remove the bait of the pollen and or alarm phermone and the SHB population will dwindle as a result.  That's why the feeding of pollen patties can doom a hive if feed too much or too long the SHB will show up.  The SHB are also opptunistic and lay their eggs in either cells of bee bread or brood cells, so hygenic behavior is essential in figthing SHB just as is in fighting varroa.
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Daddys Girl
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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2009, 09:35:23 AM »

I made some little traps from squares of offcast corrugated plastic signboard.  Tape one end of the openings and put in some DE.  Place this on the screened floor.  The bees can run the SHBs into the trap, where the DE finishes them off.

Tillie had posted a video of a homemade SHB trap.  It was pretty simple to make.

I am not sure if this bore any fruit or not, when I did it last year.  a strong hive will send the little buggers running for cover, so giving them a place to go die has an appeal.  I am actually interested in knowing what people think of the various commercial traps out there.
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Grandma_DOG
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Build it, and they will comb.


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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2009, 02:48:40 AM »

I've not seen any SHB in one of my KTBH. But the bees are a bit hot and may be Africanized. I'm in Texas, after all. Overall, I suspect TBH by design lowers the load of SHB vs a Langtroth. There's fewer places to hide. Mites, however.....ugg.

I, too, can vouch for infestations in tree cutouts I've done.

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SlickMick
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2009, 06:46:03 AM »

I made some little traps from squares of offcast corrugated plastic signboard.  Tape one end of the openings and put in some DE.  Place this on the screened floor. The bees can run the SHBs into the trap, where the DE finishes them off

Hi Daddy's Girl, I have tried the coreflute but with borax in the corrugations. I have no idea what DE is. Can you please enlighten me

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
ArmucheeBee
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« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2009, 02:27:45 PM »

DE is roach bait, like that in a roach motel--I believe.
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Stephen Stewart
2nd Grade Teacher

"You don't need a license to drive a sandwich."  SpongeBob Squarepants
Natalie
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« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2009, 08:08:54 PM »

DE or Diatomaceous earth is an insect killer. Its not used as a bait to capture anything, it kills them.
Its also sold as a pool cleaner.
 Its a fine powder but sharp like glass to insects and cuts up the inside of an insect so that they dry out.
While its considered all natural I doubt its safe to use in that close of a proximity to bees.
I am surprised to hear it recommended in a bee hive.
I use to use it in my chicken pens, in the shavings on the floor to control flies but stopped when I got bees.
I know someone that used in a chicken pen and it killed her brand new chicks and not in a quick manner either.
There is alot of information about this online, here is a couple of blurbs I found quickly.

 DE, TSS, diatomite, diahydro, kieselguhr, kieselgur or celite — is a naturally occurring, soft, chalk-like sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. This powder has an abrasive feel, similar to pumice powder, and is very light, due to its high porosity. The typical chemical composition of diatomaceous earth is 86% silica, 5% sodium, 3% magnesium and 2% iron.

Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled algae. It is used as a filtration aid, as a mild abrasive, as a mechanical insecticide, as an absorbent for liquids, as cat litter, as an activator in blood clotting studies, and as a component of dynamite. As it is also heat-resistant, it can be used as a thermal insulator.

Use Perma-Guard Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth as a natural insecticide for the non-chemical control of aphids, whiteflies, beetles, loppers, mites, leafhoppers, and other insects. Sprinkle it inside your greenhouse, or outdoors on fruits, vegetable plants, flowers, grains, and grass—up to and including the day of harvest.

Diatomaceous Earth controls insects by using physical, not chemical, action: It punctures an insect’s exoskeleton and absorbs its body fluids

Diatomaceous Earth Crawling Insect Killer is a natural mechanical insecticide that is an excellent alternative to toxic, chemical pesticides. It is made from the fossilized shells of tiny sea creatures called diatoms. It comes in the form of a chalky powder.

Because it is like a light dust, it easily clings to the bodies of insects as they walk and crawl over it. The tiny glass-like particles then cut the waxy coating of insects and they eventually dry out and die. Insects come in contact or ingest this powder and die within 48 hours. Insects cannot become immune to Diatomaceous Earth.



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SlickMick
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Location: Brisbane, Australia


« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2009, 02:54:12 AM »

Thanks Natalie for your explanation. I can see why it is used as a natural insecticide.

Mick
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On the outer Barcoo where the churches are few,
   And men of religion are scanty,
On a road never cross'd 'cept by folk that are lost,
   One Michael Magee had a shanty.

Now this Mike was the dad of a ten-year-old lad,
   Plump, healthy, and stoutly conditioned;
He was strong as the best, but poor Mike had no rest
   For the youngster had never been christened,
A BUSH CHRISTENING - A.B. "Banjo" Paterson http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/christen.html
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