Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 27, 2014, 06:06:25 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: queen age and honey production / shaking own bees  (Read 1177 times)
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« on: April 19, 2009, 02:03:41 PM »

I am curious how much queen age will affect honey production?  Ive read that you should re-queen hives every year, every two years and have even read that if you know what you are doing some queens are good for three years.  So what is the truth in your opinion and how much does it affect honey harvests?  Will you lose 20% production on average as an example with a 2nd year queen?

Also, how late in the year could I shake a couple pounds of bees, introduce a queen and reliably have them survive the coming winter?  I live in Wisconsin.

Thanks for any information you can provide.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
SgtMaj
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1464


Location: Corryton, TN


« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2009, 02:55:58 PM »

The reason some people suggest requeening more often is as a measure of reproductive swarm prevention.  Hives with newer queens are less likely to swarm early in the season (just before the spring flow), which means there will be more bees in the hive to collect more nectar and you will get a better harvest from that hive as opposed to one that swarms a couple of times before the flow and is left with only a few thousand bees and a virgin queen when the flow hits.  Of course, all that might be for naught if the beekeper doesn't give them ample room for nectar storage and doesn't make the bees crawl through the crowded brood chambers to get to the honey supers which could cause the bees to swarm due to space issues during the flow.

Also, preventing swarms also makes the neighbors happier if they aren't beekeepers.
Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2009, 04:45:53 PM »

You can re queen every 6 months but if she is producing inferior stock then you need a new queen.
like was said, swarm prevention and gentleness are the main 2 reason to re queen every year. :)doak
Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2009, 06:37:20 PM »

And honey production.
If you have a colony that is a poor honey producer, re-queen with a queen from other stock , not her.
 :)doak
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2009, 07:29:44 PM »

Brother Adam said a queen does her best work in her second year...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 02:49:01 AM »

Thanks everyone for the information you provided. 
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.225 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 30, 2014, 01:07:25 PM