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Author Topic: comb color  (Read 953 times)
Big John
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Location: Greenup Co., Kentucky


« on: April 18, 2009, 12:04:40 PM »

I installed a 3lb Russian package on 30 Mar 2009, one 4.9 foundation frame and the rest 4.9 starter strips 3/4" across the top.
I installed a 3lb Italian package on 2 Apr 2009, one drawn regular foundation the rest 4.9 starter strips 3/4" across the top.
I checked on queens 3 days after instantiation the were released. I done full inspection on 17 Apr 2009 thought they might be even because of the drawn foundation but the Russian bees had 6 frames almost fully drawn out and the Italian bees had only about 3 1/2 drawn out, both hives had caped cells and larvae, eggs, very few drone cells caped no supersede cells.
These hives are about 8" apart, I was wondering why the Italian bees are drawing pretty white comb out while the Russian bees are drawing some of the prettiest dark yellow comb I have ever seen all of it is very dark yellow.
Both hives are doing good and look like the are building out to be strong hives.
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Big John
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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2009, 12:45:28 PM »

Sorry I put this in the wrong topic don't know how to change it.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2009, 02:35:47 AM »

Are you feeding?  Nice white comb comes from sugar syrup.  Comb from nectar is off white, at best, and often yellowish.  The yellowish color on the combs can also come from pollen.

I've found that Russians and Carnolians will prefer to forage for nectar than take syrup while Italians are the opposite.

I get to validate my theory starting next Saturday as I pickup 1 package of Cordovan Italians and 1 of OWC.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Big John
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Location: Greenup Co., Kentucky


« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2009, 06:15:02 AM »

Yes I am feeding 1-1 sugar syrup, the Italians have took about 1gal of syrup and the Russian have took about 2gal of syrup. I have watched them every day the Italians fly earlier than the Russians but the Russians are better workers (faster in and out of the hive and more traffic) they are bring in a lot more pollen than the Italians
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Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
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Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2009, 02:00:39 AM »

Yes I am feeding 1-1 sugar syrup, the Italians have took about 1gal of syrup and the Russian have took about 2gal of syrup. I have watched them every day the Italians fly earlier than the Russians but the Russians are better workers (faster in and out of the hive and more traffic) they are bring in a lot more pollen than the Italians

The Russians will build up faster than the Italians.  The pollen count you've noticed per hive is a proof of it.  It takes a lot of pollen as well as honey to produce a good amount of bees.  Russians are geared for shorter foraging opportunities and have learned that more bees can produce more honey so they build up quickly in the spring, often swarm my mid-April, even in colder climates, and then shut down in mid-late August and go into survival mode, topping of stores and reducing brood production. 
Italians on the other hand build up at a steady pace through June, then begin gradually drop back.  They put as much effort into stores early on as they do brood production.  During the Spring an Italian hive will probably have more honey stores than the Russians do.
But at the end of summer the Russians have produced as much, if not more, honey as the Italians, have a smaller group of bees going into cluster and just as much in the way of stores.  In the spring the Russians will have a smaller cluster and likely twice as much honey stores left from which to begin brood development than the Italians.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Big John
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Location: Greenup Co., Kentucky


« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 07:03:27 AM »

Thaks for your answers Brian.
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