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Author Topic: Bee Removal question - getting them to abscond  (Read 1029 times)
Cheryl
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« on: April 15, 2009, 11:57:18 AM »

(oops, I realize now that there is a sub-form/child-board, mods, please move)

Scenario: Bees arrived at a clients' home three days ago. They are in a narrow
chamber between wall studs, on a portion of a roof gable that is high up and
hard to reach. They haven't been there long enough to build enough comb (rear
brood, make honey) to make a mess when they leave.

Safest thing for the bees and the easiest thing for me would be to convince
them to abscond - hopefully to my swarm trap. If not, that's OK too - will
probably meet up with them later anyway. If I can get them to abscond, the
landlord will seal the space off (was left open by a contractor after fixing a
roof leak).

I've read that bees hate tea-tree oil. I placed a cotton ball saturated with
tea tree oil in close proximity to their entrance. I would have liked to drilled
into the outer wall on the far side of their chamber and put the cotton in
there, but was unable to reach that. I used my tallest ladder and a long stick
to place the cotton in a crevice.

After placing the cotton w/ tea-tree oil, the bees were very unhappy with me
(one followed me a good 100ft, bumping my veil, and didn't give up until I left
completely). Yes, they need to be unhappy in order to abscond from their current
location.... my concern is that someone in the neighborhood might be randomly
stung. Hopefully not.

How would you convince bees to abscond from a short-term residence before the
queen starts laying?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2009, 12:07:42 PM by Cheryl » Logged

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JP
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« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2009, 12:08:14 PM »

Never heard of using tea tree oil, but if it works, great. I like bee quick. You want to inject whatever you use behind the hive forcing them out. If you put it in front of the hive you run the risk of forcing them further in or into another section of the building.

Best scenario would be to place a bait hive with brood and trap them out. With a swarm that new they may just leave on their own with an attractive set up using brood to lure them. Add some honey frames for good measure and bee bread if you have some to spare.


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Cheryl
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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2009, 12:30:51 PM »

You want to inject whatever you use behind the hive forcing them out.
I would very much have liked to do this! I may still.... but I'll need a taller ladder...
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2009, 12:31:03 PM »

tea tree oil won't do it.  in fact, it's something used in sugar syrup in the hopes that it will treat chalkbrood.  it didn't cure my chalkbrood, but the bees sure took it down!  smiley
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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2009, 02:00:02 PM »


I've read that bees hate tea-tree oil. I placed a cotton ball saturated with
tea tree oil in close proximity to their entrance. I would have liked to drilled
into the outer wall on the far side of their chamber and put the cotton in
there, but was unable to reach that. I used my tallest ladder and a long stick
to place the cotton in a crevice.

After placing the cotton w/ tea-tree oil, the bees were very unhappy with me
(one followed me a good 100ft, bumping my veil, and didn't give up until I left
completely). Yes, they need to be unhappy in order to abscond from their current
location.... my concern is that someone in the neighborhood might be randomly
stung. Hopefully not.

Never heard about using tea tree oil, but I have heard stories of using rat poison by the entrance. 

Quote
How would you convince bees to abscond from a short-term residence before the
queen starts laying?

She is most likely laying like gang busters by this time.   It is amazing how fast swarms build comb and make stores.

I think you chances of getting them to abscond are low,  but I guess it is worth a try.   I once tried to get a colony out of a tree by drilling a hole in the back under the comb and injecting a 1/2 bottle of Bee Gone without success.

A cut-out or trap-out may be the best options.  After all, if you read Iddee's How-to on trap outs, you will see that trap outs within a few days of the bees taking up residence will lead to absconding.
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Cheryl
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Location: Tucson AZ, USA

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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2009, 12:49:43 AM »

Thanks for all the good suggestions, everyone! Much appreciated. I'll be following up with my client in the morning.
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Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

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