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Author Topic: Best material for beekeeping gloves  (Read 4546 times)
Yarra_Valley
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Location: Healesville, Victoria, Australia


« on: March 02, 2005, 07:37:13 AM »

Hi everyone.

I've just transformed a pair of leather garden gloves into beekeeping gloves by sewing on sleeves I made out of light canvas. They'll do the trick for now, but I want to make something that's fit a bit better.

I'm wondering what material and thickness is most suited to making beekeeping gloves. I hear good things about kid leather.  I know a lot of you guys don't use them, but even when I'm more confident with the bees, I'll still have friends mad bees to play with  rolleyes.

So, I think I want to make something less clumsy and bulky, but that is still sting proof. Tailoring something to make it fit really well takes a bit of time, but I think it's kind of fun.  Have a few awesome friends who make costumes and stuff too who are willing to teach me!


Thanks everyone.
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asleitch
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Location: UK


« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2005, 08:20:57 AM »

I use thin latex surgical gloves like these.

Benefits are:

You can pick up the queen and feel that you aren't squashing her

You can dispose of them after each apiary visit, or between apiary visits to ensure you never spread disease

They are comfortable and cheap

You can use them afterwards for decorating/household jobs

They never become caked in propolis as you don't reuse them

They protect you bascuase the bees can't get a grip on the surface " as their isn't anything to cling to to push the sting in. If I have a really nasty colony I wear rubber washing up gloves as well.





And maybe a bit clearer here:

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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2005, 06:20:03 PM »

I tried some garden/work gloves before I bought my bee suit. I hated it. It was like wearing baseball mits, and I got a terrible sting on my knuckle.

I'll have to try the plastic gloves idea. Actually, I'm allergic to latex, but have a box of nitril (spelling?) gloves that are actually thicker than latex. I'll try them. Smiley

Beth
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Yarra_Valley
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Location: Healesville, Victoria, Australia


« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2005, 08:20:19 PM »

Yeah I have a heap of nitrile/nitrex (brand names) gloves around so I might give those a go, although the blue is supposed to annoy the bees a bit.  I think I'll figure out pretty quick if they don't work.  Still wouldn't mind making a pair though Smiley.

Asleitch: What pen are you using to mark the queen in that photo? I need to mark my queens sometime.  I'm wondering if you need a special pen from a beekeeping supplier that will adhere to the queen or if you can get suitable markers at office supply stores.
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asleitch
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« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2005, 03:29:48 AM »

Quote from: Yarra_Valley

Asleitch: What pen are you using to mark the queen in that photo? I need to mark my queens sometime.  I'm wondering if you need a special pen from a beekeeping supplier that will adhere to the queen or if you can get suitable markers at office supply stores.


Like this:



If I can remember - I can give you details. Basically I was recommended to use these pens rather than "tippex" - the white correction fluid - as the chemical vapours of that sometimes cuase the bees to kill the queen.

The pens are not specific for "beekeeping" but I presume at least some though must have gone in supplying a type which is suitable.

I'd just look through some of your US beekeeping catalogues.

Adam

*from the site I hooked that photo from....

"Water based, non toxic, non fade and quick drying. Very easy to apply. Will not dry out. Built in agitator mixes paint prior to use. In all five international colours."
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icra
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2005, 02:46:14 PM »

I use kitchen gloves they are made from thin rubber:






 Cheesy
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Yarra_Valley
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2005, 07:37:08 PM »

Hi there icra, thanks for stopping by. How affective are those gloves?
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icra
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2005, 05:46:12 AM »

Quote from: Yarra_Valley
Hi there icra, thanks for stopping by. How affective are those gloves?


The gloves are very good, they are not  bulk and the bees can't sting through them!
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williams460
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« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2005, 11:00:46 PM »

I have the best way, go with out I never use gloves ever never ,dont like them, wont be incumbered by them.No suit either .Any one tried nude yet i aint but ,heck i aint dead yet either.HMM
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BEE LOVER
Horns Pure Honey
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Location: Illinois


« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2005, 11:43:37 AM »

I like my thin pig skin leather gloves. I can feal what I am doing and they are very comfortable. bye Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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