Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 23, 2014, 06:23:52 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: First Hive  (Read 1333 times)
pollenchucker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 53


Location: Derby, NC

42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« on: April 08, 2009, 07:05:23 PM »

I have a few different things I would like to ask for info on.
But first I will give you a run down on what I have going on.
I bought my hive locally from a well respected fellow.  I got 2 used brood boxes, one of which was full of bees thick on every frame and where all the comb was already drawn out, 10 frames.  The other box has 9 frames and foundation but no work yet by the bees. 
At first the bees were a little slow getting going, this would be 4 days ago.  On their first day they started moving around and exploring.  They also moved out of the hive a bunch of dead bees.  Not a ton, I didnt count them but compared to what was inside I would say it was rather insignificant.  Just about a couple table spoons full.  It was warm that day and they eventually began leaving the hive exploring around.
Then we got a little cold snap so I put the entrance reducer in to cut down on cold air flow going into the hive and also put the catcher under my screened bottom board to do the same.  I also had already put in place a top feeder inside its own thin super which has venting.  So when the weather turned cooler I put the inner cover in for additional insulation.
Yesterday was kinda cool and I did not see much activity.  And this morning I watched 2 bees exit the hive about 5 minutes apart.  But by noon the temp was in the upper 50s under sunny skies and the bees were very active coming and going in multiple directions.  I have not opened the hive again for 2 days now.  I dont want to keep going in and messing around with them while it appears they are busy and working.  I also want to add I did not see any dead bees or other debris moved out of the hive this am.
I noticed a fair number of bees coming home in the evening that cant quite make it all the way.  Some of them land in the grass out in front of the hive and sit there for a minute or so then fly back to the hive and some others just crawl around, often in the wrong direction.  Its not that many but my dogs have already learned to keep their snouts out of the hive entrance but they do like to target the bees that hit the ground, when they see the opportunity.  I am guessing this is fairly normal bee activity when they are tired or something.  Like I said most of them that end up in the grass get back up and into the hive, though a small percentage of those do not.   I was able to get one to crawl up a stick and set her on the front porch and watch her crawl into the hive though I have to wonder if that actually did anyone any good or not. I noticed one of her wings was torn in half.
Anyway 4 days in I am seeing all kinds of different behaviors.  Anyone recommend some reading on how to try to understand what I am seeing?
-pc

Logged
bailey
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 874


Location: RACELAND LA


« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2009, 07:22:32 PM »

keep watching your bees and reading here on the forum.
that is the best teacher you could want.

get another hive for the options of manipulation, ( eggs,bees )
try to stay out of the hives ( you wont be able to resist so limit your inspections to biweekly)
start making supers now! you will need them.

relax and enjoy !

bailey
Logged

most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Two Bees
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 614


Location: Central NC


« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2009, 07:42:40 PM »

Congrats on your first hive!

I would give them some time to settle down and you will probably see that they will start doing what bees do.........flying for pollen and nectar, orientation flights in the mid afternoon, and just generally buzzing around. 

Just when you think you have figured out their routine though, they will do something to catch your totally off-guard!

Logged

"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.
pollenchucker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 53


Location: Derby, NC

42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 08:46:25 PM »

OK cool thanks.  Seems like the road I am already on. Smiley
-pc
Logged
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 5900

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2009, 10:01:04 PM »

What Bailey said, especially the part about two hives.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2009, 10:21:43 PM »

PC.  You have entered the secret life of the honeybees, under their spell yet, hee, hee, smiling.  Watching the bees is one of the most finest things in life, you will always see so many different things going on, constantly.  it is normal for the early mornings when the temperature is yet too cool to fly for the bees to remain indoors.  They know where lies their balmy tropical life, their home is warm, lovely humidity and full of the beautiful scents of the hive.  You will soon know all glories of the scent of the bees.  I can stand 10 feet from mine in summertime, and recognize in a heartbeat that beautiful scent, the scent of pure, cleanliness beyond the human scope of imagination and love....

Take your time with the bees.  Get another colony when you can, that is a must. There are so many good reasons for that.  The main one, is that you can compare how each colony works.  If you have a queen failure, instead of allowing the  bees to raise a queen themselves, you could combine the colonies, you can take eggs and brood from the queen right colony and give to the queenless colony and they can make a queen; there is a mountain of reasons to have two colonies.  Many people do only have one, though, it is not a must.  (that is if they have young enough larvae to raise a queen).

Personally, I believe that you have the right the first year with the bees to go into the colony as often as you like.  It may set them back just a tad, but having that hands'-on knowledge of what is going on inside the hive is worth its weight in gold.  Once you feel like you really have a good handle on the inside workings of a colony, leave them alone a little more.  The more familiar you become with the bees, the more you will see that you don't need to go in as often as you think you may have to.  Good luck, your life amongst the bees has begun.  Have that wonderfully great and awesome day, love this life, great health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
pollenchucker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 53


Location: Derby, NC

42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2009, 06:00:01 PM »

Ah well thank you all. I am trying my utmost to leave the bees alone since I can see they are working, by going back and forth in furious motion.   They have pretty much quit cleaning out the hive though occasionally there is a singular piece of debris.
I removed the debris tray from the hive stand this afternoon and noticed it was full of little black hard specks, some yellow powdery looking granules, some cellophane clear substances that looked like they were once wrapped around something, and then also alot of just little golden toasty things that looked liked bread crumbs.  I'm guessing most of that was bee parts and some were pupa and maybe a smidgen was pollen.  I also found one live critter that was light tan in color, looked liked a tiny crab, but walked straight instead of sideways, some kind of mite perhaps.
I still have not checked the second brood chamber, and will probably wait a few more days before I do.  But the overhead sugarwater feeder does not appear to have been touched as I did check that today.
Anyway, thank you all for your comments and your help.  I think everything is so far working in the right direction.
-pc
Logged
bailey
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 874


Location: RACELAND LA


« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2009, 10:46:15 PM »

the little crab critter was probably a vorroa mite, did you smash it? evil

bailey
Logged

most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2009, 01:15:27 AM »

I have a few different things I would like to ask for info on.
But first I will give you a run down on what I have going on.
I bought my hive locally from a well respected fellow.  I got 2 used brood boxes, one of which was full of bees thick on every frame and where all the comb was already drawn out, 10 frames.  The other box has 9 frames and foundation but no work yet by the bees. 

the 9 frame is a honey frame designed for harvesting honey, you will want to get a 2nd 10 frame box and use a double brood box in your area.  The colder temps in the north will require the amount of honey 2 boxes can hold in order to successfully overwinter.
 
Quote
At first the bees were a little slow getting going, this would be 4 days ago.  On their first day they started moving around and exploring.  They also moved out of the hive a bunch of dead bees.  Not a ton, I didnt count them but compared to what was inside I would say it was rather insignificant.  Just about a couple table spoons full.  It was warm that day and they eventually began leaving the hive exploring around.

All typical behavior for bees in a new location.  The removal of dead bees is a sign the hive is most probably healthy and hygenic.  a little house cleaning.

Quote
Then we got a little cold snap so I put the entrance reducer in to cut down on cold air flow going into the hive and also put the catcher under my screened bottom board to do the same.  I also had already put in place a top feeder inside its own thin super which has venting.  So when the weather turned cooler I put the inner cover in for additional insulation.

That much fiddling with the mite board, etc, isn't necessary.  I overwinter my bees using bottomless hives, mite boards left off, a small vent at the top, and temps, like you, sometimes into the single digits for a week or so at a time.  Cold doesn't kill the bees, getting wet and then freezing, running out of stores, or preditors (2 & 4 legged) kill the hive.

Quote
Yesterday was kinda cool and I did not see much activity.  And this morning I watched 2 bees exit the hive about 5 minutes apart.  But by noon the temp was in the upper 50s under sunny skies and the bees were very active coming and going in multiple directions.  I have not opened the hive again for 2 days now.  I dont want to keep going in and messing around with them while it appears they are busy and working.  I also want to add I did not see any dead bees or other debris moved out of the hive this am.
I noticed a fair number of bees coming home in the evening that cant quite make it all the way.  Some of them land in the grass out in front of the hive and sit there for a minute or so then fly back to the hive and some others just crawl around, often in the wrong direction.  Its not that many but my dogs have already learned to keep their snouts out of the hive entrance but they do like to target the bees that hit the ground, when they see the opportunity.  I am guessing this is fairly normal bee activity when they are tired or something.  Like I said most of them that end up in the grass get back up and into the hive, though a small percentage of those do not.   I was able to get one to crawl up a stick and set her on the front porch and watch her crawl into the hive though I have to wonder if that actually did anyone any good or not. I noticed one of her wings was torn in half.
Anyway 4 days in I am seeing all kinds of different behaviors.  Anyone recommend some reading on how to try to understand what I am seeing?
-pc

The bees will fly for forage at temps as low as mid 30's if Russian or Carniolans and mid 40;s if Italians.  As the day warms up more bees will begin to forage, this is why having the hives located in full sun is important, that heat on the hive energizes them.
You will notice over time that returning bees laden with pollen and/or nectar will take frequent rest breaks on the way back to the hive, very few on the way out unless it is a farily long distance.  I've seen a bee land 300 feet from the hive, wait a minute or 2 then take off, land 100 feet from the hive and rest for a minute, and on approaching the hive is so laden with nector or pollen that he lands short (in front of the hive).  They the crawl up the hive stand and into the hive.
Working Forager bees can literally wear out their wings in a week.  You will sometimes see bees with wings like tattered flags walking away from the hive.  Walking away from the hive is a bees last hygenic act for the good of the hive so that piles of dead bees don't build up in front of the entrance.
I would recommend placing a chair about 15 or 20 feet from the entrance to the hive and just spend an hour a day watching the bees come and go.  You will see a host of interesting things.  What you see will make you read up on beekeeping and ask questions here at the forum.  Just watching the entrance will reveal a lot of distinct behavior patterns of the bees.  You may even see washboarding,  the waggle dance, scout bees from another hive trying to probe of weakness so they can rob your hive, etc.  Inside it is even more diverse.  Seeing 3-4 worker bees all doing the waggle dance on the same side of a frame of comb is a exciting as finding the queen.

You have entered the Twilight Zone....may strange events occur there... grin
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
tlynn
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 529

Location: Tampa Bay, Florida


« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2009, 01:22:31 AM »

On the lines of what Cindi said...inspect your bees weekly for a while if you want.  It's all about learning and having fun.  They'll be fine.  Just remember when you start pulling out frames you want to remove one of the end frames first.  They store nectar and pollen here.  Give it a look for the queen.  She in all likelihood won't be on that frame, but just the same take a look, and then set it next to the hive.  Then gently spread apart the subsequent frames one at a time with your hive tool and lift them straight out, inspect, and replace.  This will keep you from potentially damaging or killing your queen because you can roll her between 2 frames if you pull frames that are tight against one another.  Be mindful of every place you put your fingers on the frame so as not to crush bees.  If you do crush a bee, give a puff a smoke on your hand to quell the alarm phermones.  Just make every movement slow and deliberate.  Your bees will appreciate it.  Look for eggs in the bottoms of the cells.  They will look like little rice grains but much much smaller.  If you happen to be old enough to need reading glasses you probably will need them to see eggs.  Just get the sun to your back, shining straight in.  Notice the difference in larval stages.  You may see a worker chewing her way out of a cell.  Notice the different pollen colors.

It's just marvelous what these girls accomplish and it's worth witnessing frequently if you're going to go to the effort of getting into the hobby!
Logged
pollenchucker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 53


Location: Derby, NC

42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2009, 01:35:45 PM »

Thanks again for the replies.  Very helpful 
I do have a chair set up about 6 ft from the hive and watch them every day without going over and disturbing their activities.  I noticed today about maybe 20% of gthe bees returning are loaded down with bright yellow pollen.  Don't know what it is or where they're getting it.  Tulip poplars will be popping in a couple weeks yet, they've just about filled in all their leaves.
Thanks again.
-pc
« Last Edit: April 10, 2009, 03:41:28 PM by pollenchucker » Logged
oldenglish
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 272

Location: Snohomish, WA. USA


WWW
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2009, 02:05:16 PM »

Your post could have been written by me, I got my hives on monday, seeing the exact same stuff, its all good. Apart from checking feed I have not opened them up yet, Mine had to build foundation from scratch and I was supprised to see them bringing in pollen right away when I assume they have to build comb first to store it in.
I am actually spending more time watching the bees than I am the TV, me and the kid have a couple buckets turned upside down and we just sit and observe, point out things to each other, my seat is probably within 3 ft and the kid sits right next to me, bees dont seem to care and makes things easier to see with my eyesight.

Real addictive and I hope the wonder and awe does not wear off over time.
Logged

Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2009, 09:57:29 PM »

A bit of trivia:  bees fly approximately 800 km in their lifetime, be in one week or two months, they then die.  Beautiful day in the great life of ours, health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
pollenchucker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 53


Location: Derby, NC

42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2009, 10:08:24 PM »

Like I said I dont know where they're going so I hope some of that brood starts popping soon too.  Anyway I'm very happy so far because the bees are active and that tells me the queen is active inside the  hive.  Right now thats all I can hope for.  Later on I will start hoping for other stuff.
It's raining here tonight and I planted a few bee flowers this afternoon so thats one of the things I will be hoping for later.
-pc
Logged
pollenchucker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 53


Location: Derby, NC

42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2009, 03:05:51 PM »

I saw something today totally new to me, had me confused and worried.
The bees were doing fine, bringing in a few different colored pollens like from yellow to orange.  I saw a few up toward the house which is north of the hive and the first time I saw any up here working the flowers on a vibernum tree.
I had been moving the sprinkler around in the garden a little bit because my sunflowers just began sprouting, and maybe some of the droplets hit the hive I can't say for sure because it is well protected on the north side and fairly well protected by bushes on the nw side.  When I went back the bees were all in a stir. It was like a small cloud of them streaming out the hive and circling around and round it.  They didn't seem to be going anywhere and few seemed to be coming in.
I noticed some wrestling in the grass out front and every now and then a bee being dragged out the front door.  Most often the bee in control would take it down into the grass and drag it around some, one did that and then still holding the bee flew out 20 feet then looped back around and from an altitude of about 12 feet dropped the bee like a little rock into a peach tree.   Anyway this activity went on for about 30 minutes or so then everything started settling back down again.  I'm thinking this may have been a robbing attempt because of the flurry of activity and I have not seen any dead bees being dragged out of the hive since the first couple days after setting up.
And if it was I guess the hive protected itself this time.
Or maybe it could have been something else.  Any ideas?
-pc

Logged
bailey
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 874


Location: RACELAND LA


« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2009, 03:52:53 PM »

sounds like either a bathroom flight or an orientation flight.  it sounds like normal activity.
keep watching and asking questions, you will learn much.

bailey
Logged

most often i find my greatest source of stress to be OPS  ( other peoples stupidity )

It is better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought of as a fool than to open ones mouth and in so doing remove all doubt.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.367 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 20, 2014, 05:19:29 PM