Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 30, 2014, 08:33:01 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: queen cup on bottom of frame and swarm?  (Read 871 times)
tlynn
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 529

Location: Tampa Bay, Florida


« on: April 05, 2009, 10:45:16 PM »

Yesterday I found these cells on the bottom of a frame in a 2 deep hive (bottom box) that experienced a supercedure less than a month ago.  I gave her a second brood box with new duraglit 3 weeks ago today and the second shot is a frame representative of 6 of the frames in this new box.  I am going to add a 3rd brood box this week and plan to do splits in a month when new queens arrive.  Do you think they're planning to swarm, even with the new real estate they have?







Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15030


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2009, 10:47:46 PM »

nice brood pattern.  add the box.  is it time for honey yet? 

maybe no swarm.  found the same in a super today and the hive appears queenless. maybe a virgin around somewhere waiting for drones and weather. however, if that is what your whole hive looks like, you  won't have much room soon.  then you'll get a swarm almost certainly.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Cheryl
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 232


Location: Tucson AZ, USA

top bar beekeeper


« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2009, 10:50:01 PM »

It is bees' natural tendency to swarm. Swarming is a good thing; it means a healthy colony. Catching it before they swarm and doing a split sometimes saves the work of trying to catch the swarm later -- but neither is foolproof.

And WOW, that's a lot of capped brood in the second photo!
Logged

We are what we repeatedly do.
Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

~ Aristotle
tlynn
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 529

Location: Tampa Bay, Florida


« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2009, 10:56:44 PM »

nice brood pattern.  add the box.  is it time for honey yet? 

maybe no swarm.  found the same in a super today and the hive appears queenless. maybe a virgin around somewhere waiting for drones and weather. however, if that is what your whole hive looks like, you  won't have much room soon.  then you'll get a swarm almost certainly.

Yes, there's a citrus flow on now.  One super mostly capped so far and another half full.  And hive is solid brood like that in box 2 and box one in more stages of development but full just the same.  There is a good bit of drone comb on a couple frames as well.  Thought I'd have a little more time and so scrambled to order new woodenware last week when I saw the second new box full of eggs and larvae last week.
Logged
Cheryl
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 232


Location: Tucson AZ, USA

top bar beekeeper


« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2009, 11:00:00 PM »

That's quite a queen you've got there!! The supersedure was a good one! Congrats!
Logged

We are what we repeatedly do.
Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

~ Aristotle
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13588


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2009, 07:12:39 PM »

If there is no larvae in the cup I wouldn't consider it to mean anything.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
tlynn
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 529

Location: Tampa Bay, Florida


« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2009, 11:47:21 PM »

If there is no larvae in the cup I wouldn't consider it to mean anything.


They were both empty.
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2009, 11:47:37 PM »

If there is no larvae in the cup I wouldn't consider it to mean anything.


A lot of hives, regardless of race, maintain queen cups all year long.  They will make some, tear some down, build others and tear those down.   Until I see and egg, larvae, or capped queen cell I ignore them.  Russians build a lot more of them than do Italians.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.484 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 24, 2014, 02:09:01 AM
anything