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Author Topic: Creating a Hive from New Queen Cells  (Read 714 times)

Offline Two Bees

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Creating a Hive from New Queen Cells
« on: April 01, 2009, 08:49:13 AM »
This past Saturday, I opened a hive consisting of 2 deeps and a medium super without an excluder and found it to be packed with bees.  I did a simulated swarm by removing 5 frames with the old queen and placed them into a new deep to create a new hive.  I replaced the removed frames with frames of foundation (didn't have any drawn comb) in the old hive.  Now I suspect the old hive is raising a new queen!

I am considering trying to time the hatching of the new queens from the old hive and remove a frame that has queen cells (assuming more than one frame of queen cells) and placing it in another hive along with 2-3 frames of brood/honey/pollen to create a THIRD hive.  I believe I read in one of MB's writings about splits where he places each frame of queen cells in separate nucs.   Did I understand you correctly, MB?

Thoughts? 
"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Creating a Hive from New Queen Cells
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2009, 08:32:53 PM »
>I believe I read in one of MB's writings about splits where he places each frame of queen cells in separate nucs.   Did I understand you correctly, MB?

I like doing that.  I can end up with a bunch of good queens.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline Pond Creek Farm

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Re: Creating a Hive from New Queen Cells
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2009, 09:54:03 PM »
What do you do with all of those queens?  Do you immediately create new hives or bank them?  How do you get a bunch of queens too?  Doesn't the first to hatch go around and kill the others in their cells?  (This is only what I have read and have zero experience with raising queens).  The idea of raising queens to re-queen hives, however, sounds fascinating (and hard).
Brian

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Creating a Hive from New Queen Cells
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2009, 10:21:24 PM »
>What do you do with all of those queens?  Do you immediately create new hives or bank them?

It depends on what I need, but having extra queens is always handy.  In my case I sell them.

>  How do you get a bunch of queens too?

Every nuc that has a frame of cells will end up with a queen.  If five frames have queen cells, that's five queens.

> Doesn't the first to hatch go around and kill the others in their cells?

In that nuc, yes.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline Two Bees

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Re: Creating a Hive from New Queen Cells
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2009, 08:47:35 AM »
Thanks for the info!  This weekend, I think I will try to remove some of the queen cells before they have had a chance to hatch.

That would mean that the new queen cells would be 8 days old (last Saturday to this Saturday) if the old hive started with a one-day old egg.  Or the new queen cells could be as old as 11 days if they used a three-day old egg. 

So, if I'm going to pull queen cells for nucs, I better make the move this weekend!

Anyone see a problem with my plan (or math)?
"Don't know what I'd do without that boy......but I'm sure willin' to give it a try!"
J.D. Clampett commenting about Jethro Bodine.