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Author Topic: Latest date to install bees  (Read 928 times)
bsteele
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Location: St Joseph, MO


« on: March 27, 2009, 04:31:40 PM »

I'm totally new to beekeeping and currently constructing a langstroth hive.  What is the latest date you'd recommend installing bees?  I live in the midwest near Kansas City. 

Is it too late to order bees? 

I should have it completed and frames installed in a week ot two.

Thanks.
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Keith13
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Location: Baton Rouge, LA


« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2009, 04:57:54 PM »

You can still install bees in your are Michael Bush will probably weigh in on this but I think if anything it might still be early in your area. The problem might be ordering them suppliers might be booked up

Keith
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Bee-Bop
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Location: Southern Missouri


« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2009, 05:08:03 PM »


Remove this if it needs to be !

I think some one from Lee Summit has a few nuc's left !
PM me if interested, I will look up his address.


Bee-Bop
« Last Edit: March 27, 2009, 05:33:57 PM by Bee-Bop » Logged

" If Your not part of the genetic solution of breeding mite-free bees, then You're part of the problem "
Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2009, 06:38:21 PM »

The problem will be finding them.  Ask around.  The KHPA could probably direct you to people who are bringing in packages or nucs.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
JP
The Swarm King
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Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2009, 07:38:38 PM »

I don't know what the feral hive population is like in your area, but if you have trouble finding a supplier, try putting out some swarm traps and get you a hive or two from your area.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

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wharfrat
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Location: Richmond, Virginia


« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2009, 10:22:27 AM »

I installed my first ever package on unused foundation in early June last year in Richmond, Virginia.

I didn't take any honey last year, and it appears that the hive has made it through the winter. At some point last fall, they made a new queen she is not the original

It has been a cold March here, and the colony is slow to strengthen. I checked in early March, and there was limited brood, but the queen is there and there was plenty of honey. The numbers in the hive are low, and my fingers are crossed that I will have a rapid build up of numbers in April.

I think I ordered my package from Rossman Apiaries last year and received through the mail.

Best of luck. grin
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lmehaffey
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Location: Alabama


« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2009, 10:46:01 AM »

I installed my first ever package on unused foundation in early June last year in Richmond, Virginia.

I didn't take any honey last year, and it appears that the hive has made it through the winter. At some point last fall, they made a new queen she is not the original

It has been a cold March here, and the colony is slow to strengthen. I checked in early March, and there was limited brood, but the queen is there and there was plenty of honey. The numbers in the hive are low, and my fingers are crossed that I will have a rapid build up of numbers in April.

Best of luck. grin

Don't mean to "high-jack" this thread...maybe should ask this in a new topic....but: is it a good idea to not take any honey the first year? I have heard this is true and, as I'm really mostly interested in pollination for my garden, I wouldn't mind leaving the hives alone until next year, if it will make them stronger.
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It is what it is.......except when it isn't.
JP
The Swarm King
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Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2009, 12:10:54 PM »

I installed my first ever package on unused foundation in early June last year in Richmond, Virginia.

I didn't take any honey last year, and it appears that the hive has made it through the winter. At some point last fall, they made a new queen she is not the original

It has been a cold March here, and the colony is slow to strengthen. I checked in early March, and there was limited brood, but the queen is there and there was plenty of honey. The numbers in the hive are low, and my fingers are crossed that I will have a rapid build up of numbers in April.

Best of luck. grin

Don't mean to "high-jack" this thread...maybe should ask this in a new topic....but: is it a good idea to not take any honey the first year? I have heard this is true and, as I'm really mostly interested in pollination for my garden, I wouldn't mind leaving the hives alone until next year, if it will make them stronger.

It all depends on how they build up the first season and how much honey they are able to make and store.

If they are quick to build and have really good resources and are able to create a surplus, you just may be able to take some honey this season.

Also, you are in a southern region where winters are much shorter than northern bee keepers who need to leave extra feed on their hives because their bees over winter for much longer periods and would starve without extra reserves.

Package installs generally take longer to build, I've had very good luck with large swarms that I've housed that built up extremely fast and often, I am able to take some of their bounty the first season.

If you want to ensure you will get some honey the first season, start with a nuc or an established hive.

Of course, again, it depends on the nectar flow as to what they will make in any given season. Adequate rainfall feeding the flowers has a lot to do with this.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
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