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Author Topic: Treatment of Ponds with Copper Sulfate  (Read 1680 times)
acbs
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« on: March 23, 2009, 07:15:32 PM »

Was interested in knowing if anyone had any information or experience in the effects on bees of copper sulfate treated ponds. Have a bee yard near a pond that was treated with it last summer, but didn't find out about it until today. The reason for asking is I had 10 hives there, same genetics, same basic foraging area as my other yards, in general all things in common with the other bee yards, but never got any excess honey from any of the 10 hives and lost 5 hives early in the winter. Lost more in that one yard than in my other 2 yards put together. Just curious if there could be any correlation. The pond would have been treated about major nectar flow time in that area. I'm aware of all the variables involved, it's just that was the only yard that had exposure to that chemical and especially coming at that time. Thanks.
Arvin
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TwT
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Ted


« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2009, 09:08:17 PM »

I cant answer this, never heard of any who could, I am sure a lab might be able to, could have been the area, don't know?Huh why did they treat the pond, if that was to happen again then I would think of that but I really don't know!!!
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mherndon
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« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2009, 09:24:32 PM »

You can treat ponds with copper sulfate to kill the algae.  Will not harm the fish unless you treat too big of an area.  Then the reason for fish kill is the BOD (Basic Oxygen Demand) is raised due to the decomposition of the dead algae using too much oxygen to decompose.  Copper sulfate has a scary label if you breath in the dust from it.  I have had it in my eyes before, burned like crap, but my eyes were cleaner after the pain.  Copper Sulfate is also used in septic systems to prevent tree roots from growing into the field lines.  We add about a pound per ton in poultry feed just the keep feed passage in check.  Used in other feeds as well.  Keeps the ph in the gut higher I think.  Not sure what it would do to insects or bees though.

Mark
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acbs
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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2009, 09:42:45 PM »

Twt
Thanks for your response.  As Mark stated, he uses the copper sulfate to treat his pond for algae.  I'm certainly going to talk it over with him.  I tried a search to find info online.  As far as this year is concerned, I think I'll just split the hives there to get the numbers back up and watch.  Maybe it was something else.  We all know sometimes things just happen, even with all things being equal.  That was the only known variable.  Just thought someone might have run into this before.

mherndon
Thanks to you for your response.  I was able to find info much like the info you had online, but was not able to find anything in relation to bees.  One of the big concerns about using this on ponds for algae treatment was the inconsistency in concentrations of applications.  With the pond being their only source of water it made me wonder.  I don't know how they could avoid not taking it in, but can't find if a high enough concentration would cause harm.  That's what I'm concerned about.
Thanks, Arvin
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2009, 10:16:40 PM »

" The pond is their only source of water "

With a normal flight range of a 2 mile circle, I forget how many thousands of acres that is, but surely there is additional water available.

Bee-Bop
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acbs
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« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2009, 02:57:45 AM »

Bee-Bop,
Yes, technically you are correct.  It is not the "only" source of water.  This is the second year I had bees at this location.  The first year a couple of guys ran a sizable chemical free garden right next to the pond and the hives which was watered regularly.  There was no noticeable difference in production or survival compared to the other bee yards.  That was not the case last year.  There is a small "creek" (and I hesitate to call it a creek) located through some woods considerably farther away than the pond that has water in it in the early spring, and then the rest of the year only water a short time after it rains.  Given that the yard is in relatively flat farm ground other than the patch of woods, and the pond is less than 100 yards away from the hives, I think it would be safe to assume that this pond would at least be called the "primary" consistent source of water for the bees, especially at the time of year the pond was treated.
Thanks,
Arvin
« Last Edit: March 24, 2009, 03:20:12 AM by acbs » Logged

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