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Author Topic: Any tips on transporting nucs?  (Read 4550 times)
firetool
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« on: February 23, 2005, 03:04:22 PM »

I have to go about 330 miles to get the bees. I need to know what to do to the hives so the will ride weall. Do I need to place window screening over the hive entrance. would it be good to screw the hive body to the bottom board and make it where I could screw the top on after the bees are put in it. Do I need to do any extra venting? Will they be alright in the bed of the truck?

 Any ideas and help would be appriceated!

 Thanks,

 Brian
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« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2005, 03:52:43 PM »

http://www.beemaster.com/bigrog.html

is My and BigRogs moving of a regular hive - it might give you an idea or two. Good THRU ventilation is ideal but top only venting for those many miles is really necessary. But you might want some shade over the hive top if the temps are hot and sun is strong.

good air flow is really important if temps are high - I know Texas is big, so you could have a huge temp range going on - I'll look for some more pics.

PM Bigrog for his link to the boarding up the hive box pics - I'm sure he can find the link, some good photos of screwing 1x4s to hold the supers together  along with the bottom boards.
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« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2005, 04:36:26 PM »

Where are you going to get bees that close?
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« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2005, 07:19:23 PM »

Venting is key.
John and I used 1x4 to strap it together and it worked fantastic.
We used 1 5/8ths sheetrock screws and stainless screening.
This rode with me in the front seat of the Caddy.
Feel free to pm with any questions
Roger
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« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2005, 07:43:19 PM »

As BigRog said,  Ventalation is critical.    I've used racheting straps to keep everything tied together and then stapled screen over the
entrances.
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« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2005, 07:44:26 PM »

Truck bed is good.  Don't put them in a trunk - they will overheat!
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« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2005, 08:00:36 PM »

Rog:

Glad we didn't use nylon screening. I can only imagine a 1/2 hole opening up somewhere around DC.

Good wire fine mesh screen is stiff enough to hold its shape as you bend it around the boxes and holds up well to staples. Rog and I did a pretty fancy job, not leaving much room for escaping, although he had a few on the outside of the screen that took the long ride to Virginia with him Smiley
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firetool
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« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2005, 11:44:53 PM »

John,
 I am not sure, where you saying to leave the top off and cover it with screen to. I think I will be traveling at night with them, so the temp. may not be as big a concern as I first thought.

Thanks guyies,

 Brian
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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2005, 08:52:56 AM »

I traveled only 180 miles with a 5 frame nuc which had a screen bottom board and nylon screen on the top with 3/4" wood shims inserted then a top cover add, the whole thing was rachet strapped together and worked fine inside the back of the wifes SUV. I also moved one assembled about the same way then duct taped together  cheesy  cheesy .
 Cheesy Al
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BigRog
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« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2005, 11:44:59 AM »

Quote from: beemaster
Rog:

Glad we didn't use nylon screening. I can only imagine a 1/2 hole opening up somewhere around DC.

Smiley


That would have looked like the sence from Tommy Boy!

We did the way we did and it worked very well. I liked the stability it gave the hive so even when I moved it through my yard it was very secure. It took us about 15 min to put it together.
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« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2005, 11:53:42 AM »

Quote from: beemaster

Glad we didn't use nylon screening. I can only imagine a 1/2 hole opening up somewhere around DC.


That could have been a challenging driving experience:
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« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2005, 12:46:07 PM »

Let me clarify what I said. First saying this is a big country and I assume that if you are transporting bees in Texas that it is probably pretty warm. I like venting at the top and entrance to cause thru-ventilating if it is very hot and during the day time hours.

If it is night time, then surely you don't need to go to that extreme of screening the top UNLESS as Trail Twister did, as a safety feature. If it is cooler than hot, no top venting should be needed. But it can get mighty hot in Texas according where you are driving 330 miles to. If it is South of the state and laterally across the state, it could be really hot. A vertical trip could be like driving from here in NJ to Maine - trust me, we do not have the same weather here as Maine.

If you are in constant traffic, fumes could build up in the bed of a truck and draft behind the truck may not be as "windy" as many assume either. Again, fumes or hot air could get trapped in the bed.

My whole point is, the more info we have, the better we can all answer a question. Personally, I like nucs - think they are really cool for starting up a hive. But I am amazed at how far people will drive to get bees. I remember Trail Twisters adventure which was amazing to me - but 330 miles - WOW!

I never ordered nucs, I built them and have given many away for pollination to family and friends and to people wanting to see if they are comfortable with honeybees. But I have never ordered them, I have had every package delivered at my door except one time I drove 1 mile to the post office to get them.

It's a big big Country folks - even here we get and process our bees very differently - you do not have to go abroad to see differences in how we enter and manage this hobby. That is what makes beekeeping so fascinating  Cheesy
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« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2005, 01:46:06 PM »

I agree with all the posts on the importance of ventilation.

Remember,  you can easily reduce ventialtion by covering with a blanket or something.  But it is not as easy to add more.

So my advice would be to over ventilate by design, and then reduce as needed.

If these are styrofoam nukes, by all means, over ventilate.  With poor ventilation, you can get a thermal run away.  As the Hive gets hotter, the bees become more active trying to ventilate, which causes the hive to get even hotter.  I have read an incident where a hive was moved in sleeting weather during the early morning and died during the process because of poor ventilation.

Listen to the bees,  you can hear the buzz when they are trying to ventilate the hive.
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« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2005, 09:00:48 AM »

The nuc held together with duc tape. In the picture you can see the lid and wood shims that kept it off the top of the nuc. There was a screened bottom entance which just don't show in the picture.





This pictures showes the screen stapled to the top of the nuc.



 I will be using nuc's from now on when I want to interduce a new queen to a colony. I am building some now with SBBs just for that reason. I will also use the nuc's for a bit of time to start a split in.

Would I buy a nuc of bees in the future?? Knowing what I do now it would only bee with the understranding I can inspect the frames of brood before any money changes hands.

 Cheesy  Al
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BigRog
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« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2005, 12:39:20 PM »

I have a question. I am picking up three packages from dadants on 4/11.
What is my best way to transport.
I will be driving a F-150 with cap on or off as need be.
Should I build nucs and put them in or just put the packages in the back
It's a 2 1/2 hour ride. about 110 miles or 177km
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« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2005, 01:01:54 PM »

The packages are usually tacked together with strips of wood to prevent suffication (i.e. prevent something from blocking off the screen).

I would leave the cap on, and just secure the packages and go with that.  Putting them in nucs adds no value (I assume you mean just setting the packages inside the nuc, I don't imagine they would appreciate you installing the bees there)

They have made it that far with the packaging from the breeder, another 110   miles should not be a problem.
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« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2005, 02:02:15 PM »

These are the first packages that I am getting. Anyone have a pic?
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« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2005, 02:14:23 PM »

Not a very good picture, but best I could find quickly.   If you look closely you can see the packages are spaced to provide ventilation.

http://go.netgrab.com/secure/kelleystore/asp/prodtype.asp?prodtype=110


If your getting 4 packages, I would guess they would all come stapled in a row along some wooden straps.  Soet of like the top middle row in the picture
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« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2005, 02:30:20 PM »

Here is a better picture:



BTW,  Most instructions on installing have you remove the syrup can and shake the bees out.

I really like John's method of opening up the screen on one side an pouring them out.  Much easier on the bees.
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« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2005, 02:33:03 PM »

I only have a few weeks and I'll be helping make packages, get some experience making packages and I'm can't wait ( chopping at the bit) wink
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« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2005, 02:56:49 PM »

Quote from: TwT
I only have a few weeks and I'll be helping make packages, get some experience making packages and I'm can't wait ( chopping at the bit) wink


Cool, that will be an awsome experience.   Hope to hear all about it.
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