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Author Topic: Telescoping vs migratory covers  (Read 2881 times)

Offline Lesli

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Telescoping vs migratory covers
« on: February 20, 2005, 09:13:32 AM »
I've been reading that some of you use the simpler migratory covers. Other than being cheaper and not requiring an inner cover, can you tell me why? What advantages?

Thanks!
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline Robo

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Telescoping vs migratory covers
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2005, 09:49:57 AM »
Another advantage is that you can stack hives side by side and easily secure to pallets,  with the telescopic lids you always have space between them which allows for supers to shift during moving.    

Not really a big plus unless you "migrate"  or do pollination services.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline Lesli

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Telescoping vs migratory covers
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2005, 09:54:00 AM »
That's true. I found  another discussion about covers. I have enough for this year (I think--I'm doing woodenware inventory now), but was curious--especially since we have a few new members who might not have been in that discussion.
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Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/

Offline Michael Bush

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Telescoping vs migratory covers
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2005, 11:33:41 PM »
Typically in Northern climates the inner cover and telescopic cover are the norm.  The advantage is the double lid cuts down on condensation in winter.  Typically in the South and in migratory beekeeping they use the migratory cover.  Partly because the condensation isn't so big a problem in the South and, as mentioned, you can stack the hives up against each other.

I'm in the North and I decided I was tired of feeding the skunks and mice, so I went to all upper entrances.  I nailed a board across the entrance to the SBB and put a migratory cover on with some shims to make the entrance (yes the warm way).  It looks like this:

http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bush/images/MigratoryTopEntrance2.JPG

or this

http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bush/images/MigratoryTopEntrance2.JPG

I closed off about half to three fourths of the opening on most of them with a piece of lath or screen molding or just a ripped piece off of a one by and I put a piece of foam on top with the bricks holding it on.  They seemed to do fine with the moist air escaping through the upper entrance and the foam to keep the wood on top from being cold.  Condensation occurs when the moisture builds up in the top and the top is cold enough to cause the moisture in the warmer air to condense on the colder lid (like water on the side of a cold glass).  This has worked well for me.

I make a lot of my own covers out of 3/4" plywood.  The plywood stays flat better and the 3/4" is heavy enough to not blow off so easily.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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