Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 02, 2014, 05:16:00 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Trap out in progress  (Read 6760 times)
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11683


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #40 on: May 08, 2009, 07:15:13 PM »

Thanks for the info.  I have a hive in a hollowed out hole in a pecan tree about 15' up.  they have been there about 3 years living on there own.  Must be pretty good genetics.  I am gonna try and get them.  i am gonna have to build a plat for up the tree sortof like a deerstand to hold the box but other than that...should go pretty easily.  Thanks again.

Wxton, the thing is, with trap outs, you are not saving the genetics of the particular hive you are trapping out unless you are able to get that colony's queen to exit and join the catch box.

This can be done on newly established colonies sometimes, but the odds of getting an established colony's queen to exit and enter your catch box are slim to none.

What Iddee has done with this trap out and others was to use the bees in the void space being trapped to create a queen from genetics belonging to one of his own hives.

Go back and read the post from the beginning and you'll see what I mean.

If you have a colony you want to make queens from, than you could use the hive in the pecan tree to do so.

Just wanted to clarify things for you.


...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6405


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #41 on: May 08, 2009, 08:58:17 PM »

JP makes an excellent point.  I overlooked your statement about genetics.   If it is the genetics you are after,  I would leave them be and set up a few swarm traps to catch a swarm from it.  Then you will have retained the genetics.

Actually,  if the bees are not bothering anyone I would suggest leaving them be anyway.  I only recommend removing a colony if they are a nuisance or too close to people.  Let ferals be if you can.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6083

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #42 on: May 08, 2009, 09:04:30 PM »

Leave them in place and post them here. 

http://www.savethehives.com/

As said above, trapouts don't yield queens. They have to make their own from eggs provided.


Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
wxton
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 23

Location: Boston, Georgia-Home of the Boston Mini-Marathon


WWW
« Reply #43 on: May 11, 2009, 12:48:27 PM »

I will leave them there.  I will try my luck with some swarm traps as suggested.  I also registered the feral hive.  And I understand about the genetics.  I should have been able to put two and too together but sometimes it takes someone else to point it out to you.  Thanks. 
Logged

Hopefully I learned more today than I forgot yesterday!!

Britt
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6083

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #44 on: May 16, 2009, 12:09:08 PM »

We checked the trap Thurs. and found bad news. They were entering and leaving the house, and carrying in pollen. It signaled that we had removed the cone too soon. We went back Fri. and replaced the cone. It is too soon for the new queen in the box to be laying, and I have never been very successful at finding a virgin queen, so we went back today and added another frame of eggs and larva. "Just in case". If she is there, the new frame will just boost the colony. If she isn't, it will give them another chance to raise one.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6083

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #45 on: May 22, 2009, 03:51:51 PM »

Today's check.....

6 frames of bees, up from 4.
10 or more queen cells. It seems the first ones didn't take.
No bees in the cone nor trying to enter the house. Looks to be over, but we left the cone anyway. Don't want to make the same mistake again. Am thinking we may take the box down and place a different hive there to rob out the house. Will let things stay as are for a few more days, then decide the next step.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
G3farms
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1485


Location: concord, tn


« Reply #46 on: May 22, 2009, 07:40:46 PM »

iddee, I have a couple of questions..............

So after you trap all of the bees out, what happens to the queen?

I know the brood and eggs would die since there are no bees to cover them, right?

How did you learn about trap outs??

This is a great thread, and thank you for posting it and the pics.

G3
Logged

see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6083

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #47 on: May 22, 2009, 07:55:52 PM »

G3, read here...

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,20131.msg153535.html#msg153535

I learned just like you are now. Asking questions on bee forums. I listened to the ones that failed as much as the ones that succeeded. I then set them up for 4 or 5 years, studying as I went along.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6083

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #48 on: June 15, 2009, 01:13:33 PM »

Final post.....

Removed the stand and hive today and sealed the house with silicone caulk. Hasn't been a bee entered the house for several days now, so all honey has been removed.
Total time.... 3 Months

Final tally.....

7 frames of bees and a queen raised from my favorite hive.
Boosted a hive with queen from 1 frame of bees to 8 frames of bees.
10 frame medium hive with 7 frames of bees raised a queen from my favorite hive and she is now laying.
One well made trap stand, made from square tubing and diamond spaced steel platform, adjustable height.
$250.00

It has been a lot of fun and I hope it helps others doing trapouts
« Last Edit: June 16, 2009, 08:46:13 AM by iddee » Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
hoku
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 38

Location: big island, hawai'i


WWW
« Reply #49 on: June 15, 2009, 02:56:57 PM »

Your postings have help me so much!!  Thank you for the details and the pics and time spent.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #50 on: June 16, 2009, 12:14:24 PM »

Oh Iddee, well, well, well.  Three months, that has been a long time, you must have patience as high as my lucky stars.  Takin' my hat off to you.  And look how your posts have undoubtedly helped others in the trapping out process, again, a second hat off to you.  Thank you for taking this time to explain, and explain and explain.  Be proud of what you have done, your help to others.  AND....have that most wonderful, beautiful day, lovin' our great life, and groovin'.  Health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Nathen
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 29

Location: Eatontown, NJ


« Reply #51 on: June 25, 2009, 09:06:36 PM »

Question please, I can understand the trap from a fish angle however , the bees will not go back inside the small hole of screen, because?

I have always been told there are no stupid questions, althought I sort fo feel silly asking this one. Thanks

I've been wondering the same thing for a while as well, so we're both silly.  (Man, are you in poor company!)  I know iddee stressed in his trapout procedure that it is very important to seal all possible alternate entrances the first time around because once they find an alternate entrance, they become that much more determined to find other alternate entrances if you seal up the one they found.  In the pictures here, I see them sealing up possible entrances five or six feet away from the trap hive.  The hole at the end of the cone seems like such an obvious alternate entrance to me.  I don't see why they wouldn't find it.  Unless it's a light and scent issue as iddee suggested.  As sensitive as bees are to scents, I wouldn't be surprised if they used it to home in on the entrance to their hive.  Still, you would think some bees would find their way back in just by blind luck.  It's not like it's such a long shot.
Logged

-Nathen
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6083

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #52 on: June 25, 2009, 10:21:06 PM »

Have you ever used a robber screen? Six inches and the robbers can't find the entrance even tho it's all the way across the hive front.

They cannot see the cone as a solid object, so the entrance looks just like more wire mesh. They cannot distinguish between the holes in the wire and the cone entrance.

I imagine the smell also plays a part in it, along with the fact that they are oriented to the base of the cone.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.379 seconds with 23 queries.

Google visited last this page August 21, 2014, 10:46:21 PM
anything