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Author Topic: First Cut Out For The Year (Log Cut Out)  (Read 1718 times)
Carriage House Farm
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« on: March 18, 2009, 10:35:33 AM »

Things are warming up earlier than usual and something like this normally would not happen for another month or so around here, but bees have been hauling pollen in quantity since the fourth week in Feb.  Things are moving and barring a heavy freeze things are shaping up for a good first half flow.

Anyways, I did a log cut out.  Went amazingly smooth and quick.  Nabbed the queen and got them home.  THe only thing that made this all possible was a property owner willing to not throw gas on 'em and a slow fall as the rotting oak tree sort of just pulled out of the ground after Hurricane Ike last year (we got hammered, even up here in South Western Ohio!).  SO the colony survived the fall and simply started drawing comb and fixing the old comb.

A managed to place three deep frames worth of brood comb into catch frames I started making.

A little over a week later they have drawn out and repaired the brood frames and drawn out about half the two plastic pierco.  They appear honey bound and I am going to give them space.  The day after the cut-out it dropped down to 20F so I wanted to make sure they had a small chamber to heat and flourish.  Now that its into the 70s again I gave them more room.

Here is a link to the site detailing the method I used and try ot break it down step by step.  I am not the best teacher but I hope it serves as a solid piece of instruction to anyone wanting to do something similar.  It was my first time doing a log.  I've done 5 cut-outs total, 2 successful, so take that into consideration.  I am fairly new to this.

Here is the link:

Tree Removal Blog Entry

Some quick photos:





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Richard Stewart
Carriage House Farm
North Bend, Ohio

An Ohio Century Farm
JP
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« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2009, 10:51:17 AM »

Great job Richard! Enjoyed the pictures and your explanations of things.


...JP
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Keith13
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« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2009, 11:20:41 AM »

Great pics
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gmcharlie
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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2009, 01:39:12 PM »

great pics!   you mentioned a special fram for holding brood comb?  got a pic of that?  sound better than rubber bands!

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JP
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2009, 02:06:17 PM »

great pics!   you mentioned a special fram for holding brood comb?  got a pic of that?  sound better than rubber bands!




Charlie, here's some pictures of them from Robo (Rob's site)

http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/cut-out-frames/


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

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Cindi
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2009, 10:35:05 PM »

Richard, oh so cool, go Richard go!!!  Beautiful day in our great life, health.  Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2009, 08:10:38 AM »

Did you do that with an ax
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Carriage House Farm
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2009, 08:27:38 AM »

Nah, metal wedges.  The "axe" you see is a sort of maw with a sledgehammer face on one end and curved edge maw on the other.  One tool for two roles.  In this case we looked for splits (old tree, came down slow in a storm) and stress fractures.  Tap the wedge in and start swinging.  It then splits the length of the section, following the grain.  I never used it as you would an axe...just a sledge.

Sometimes the split will start but need help and then you place more wedges along the length and tap these in.  If its hardwood and usually it seems to be, it should just pop.

Use the large metal wedges too, not those plastic chainsaw plastic ones.

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Richard Stewart
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2009, 08:32:09 AM »

Why didn't you use a chainsaw
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Carriage House Farm
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« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2009, 09:14:48 AM »

I did.  Keep in mind that this section of the tree that contained the colony was about 75 feet long.  We had two chainsaws out and were clearing branches and cutting the trunk down bit by bit to find the top f the colony then guesstimated the position of the bottom of it.

What was left was this five foot section you see in the pictures above.

If you mean why not a chainsaw to open up the log...well...I think of it as the right tool for the right job.

The chainsaw sprays bar oil and makes a mess compared to simply splitting the log.  The log is hollow and dead.  Splitting it allows for FAR more control.  It takes a little more phyisical effort but that is good in my book.  Let's me work off some of my winter "stores".

Its REALLY nice to be able to find the queen and not have to worry about cutting into the comb with the saw and remove the sections of unused wax efficently without it filled with debris from a chainsaw.

Think of it like surgery and having a choice between a scapel and a pruning saw. Cheesy
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Richard Stewart
Carriage House Farm
North Bend, Ohio

An Ohio Century Farm
Irwin
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« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2009, 09:20:03 AM »

I under stand what your saying
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