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Author Topic: Quick Thymol question  (Read 1525 times)
Mklangelo
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« on: March 17, 2009, 11:35:45 AM »

First of all, hello to all. I've been away from the boards for a while.   I hope everyone is doing well with their bees.



Okay.  I had a mite count of about 7 or so in October.  Too cold to administer Thymol so I'm going to start right off with that soon. 

My question is this:  Should I do that before or after I rotate the chambers as part of my spring management? 


Thanks and have a good one!

Mike
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2009, 12:15:09 PM »

i wouldn't rotate chambers, for a start.  i'd also do another mite count.  a fall count of 7 is pretty low.  the problem with the thymol in spring is that you have to have temps >60 and you have to use it for a month.  if you are expecting a heavy flow and maybe some honey storing early, you don't want thymol on the hive.  kind of depends on your area and what you are thinking is going to happen.
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2009, 12:44:56 PM »

I'm with Kathy,  don't treat until you determine your mite level.   Treating when not necessary is bad for you, the bees, and the mites tongue
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Mklangelo
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2009, 12:47:33 PM »

Thanks for the replies. 

So perhaps with no brood developing over the winter, the mites have not been able to propagate? 

I'll do a shake.
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2009, 01:07:01 PM »

you probably had a good brood break.  i know i did.  best thing you can do is encourage good build up.  i am not opposed to treating when you need to, but if it can be avoided it's best for your bees and your pocketbook  smiley

encouraging buildup is part of the reason i don't buy the rotation of supers bit.  the less you disturb, the better.  there are time when rotation needs to be considered, but most of the time the bees will do a fine job without interference.  my admittedly limited experience and observations have led me to conclude that those hives that require the most manipulation, are the least likely to survive and thrive anyway. 
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called the government. They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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Mklangelo
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2009, 08:57:12 PM »

Thanks Kathy.

Well, I have already rotated the boxes and did the majority of my spring cleaning and the bees are bringing out their dead, which is always nice to see.  I did see stores in there since I fed the heck out of em' throughout October with straight syrup. 


I have a 15 or so deep frames with pollen and honey from last year that have been frozen.  I'll thaw those and give the ladies a boost shortly.  That should give em' a jump start. 


Since their already rotated, I'll try not doing it on some colonies next year and see what happens.  The reason I was doing it right away is it's a recommended practice in "The Hive and the Honey Bee" 

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  - Robert X. Cringely
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