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Author Topic: Help in identifying and killing  (Read 1056 times)

Offline cundald

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Help in identifying and killing
« on: March 08, 2009, 01:21:48 AM »
I have a large number of yellow jacket size bees flying over an area
of twenty or so square feet there are twenty to thirty quart inch in
diameter holes in the ground with a small mount of dirt around them. 
I saw one insect go into one of the holes.   Do I have here one big
yellow jacket nest underground or a lot of small nests or what? 

If it one big nest how do I lluminate it?   :? :? :?

cundald
The first step in the acquisition of wisdom is silence, the second listening, the third memory, the fourth practice, the fifth teaching others.
Solomon Ibn Gabriol

Offline iddee

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Re: Help in identifying and killing
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2009, 10:25:07 AM »
Do they look like small bumblebees? If so, they are solitary bees and do not bother anyone. They will do no damage, but will do much good. Just let them be and enjoy them. I like to just sit and watch them.
"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Offline ArmucheeBee

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Re: Help in identifying and killing
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2009, 10:36:37 AM »
I agree.  YJ would have one main hole.  Those are solitary.  Some feed on grubs under ground, grubs that could destroy grass, etc.  Others are caterpillar hunters and still others are pollen feeders.  I forgot how many solitary bees/wasps are in the US but it is close to 1000 I think.  They do nest communally because of favorable locations, soil, and finding mates.
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Offline fermentedhiker

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Re: Help in identifying and killing
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2009, 10:52:03 AM »
for identification you could check www.whatsthatbug.com or www.bugguide.net , but I'm with everyone else on leaving them be unless you have a VERY good reason to do otherwise.
Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
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Offline BjornBee

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Re: Help in identifying and killing
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2009, 11:01:43 AM »
  I forgot how many solitary bees/wasps are in the US but it is close to 1000 I think.  They do nest communally because of favorable locations, soil, and finding mates.

It is estimated that there are between 1500 and 1800 known and something like up to 2500 individual types solitary bees in the U.S. alone. Some are specific to a particular valley or mountain range.

I took part several years ago with a solitary bee study, that continues at PennState to this day. I think they add several new varieties of bees every year. Not sure who is heading up the study.

As with all of nature, unless health or safety is an issue, let them alone.
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Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com

Offline cundald

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Re: Help in identifying and killing
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2009, 11:28:33 AM »
I know the are not Bumblebees, I was within 3 ft of then and they are the size of YJ.

In response to the second question the bees are in the area were the dogs play.

I will check out the links and see if I can gets some pics.

cundald
The first step in the acquisition of wisdom is silence, the second listening, the third memory, the fourth practice, the fifth teaching others.
Solomon Ibn Gabriol