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Author Topic: TBH Maintenance  (Read 765 times)
jgarzasr
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Location: Michigan


« on: March 03, 2009, 12:55:37 PM »

alright I need some info.  I started a TBH a few years ago - it has survived with pretty much no management from me - besides me taking the extra honey, and making sure the Queen was doing OK.  But this year I would like to start replacing some of the Brood Comb.  However - I know there will already be some eggs (hopefully) once I start my first inspection in the comb.  So what is the best way to start removing this comb and inserting new bars?  Thanks.
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suprstakr
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Location: Pineville Mo


« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2009, 01:10:22 PM »

YES
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justgojumpit
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Location: North Salem, NY


« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2009, 02:25:02 PM »

If you have not medicated the hive at all, you can insert new top bars into the brood nest, which pushes the older combs farther back in the hive.  The bees will draw comb on the new bar and raise brood in that.  The old combs which are furthest back will get filled with honey.  You can then crush and strain this honey and you will be rid of the old comb.  You could also try to move the older comb, one top bar at a time, to the very back of the hive.  It is doubtful that the bees would abandon the brood, and once it has all hatched, you can then take the comb out.

justgojumpit
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Keeper of bees and builder of custom beekeeping equipment.
Daddys Girl
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Location: Near Harpers Ferry, WV


« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2009, 02:32:38 PM »

I have always inserted new bars between two strong combs, and continued to add bars there to push the old ones to the edge of the nest, out into the honey storage, and then eventually cut them out with the honey.  It would probably take most of the season to get the old combs into the harvest zone, but you'll probably be taking your surplus from the TBH in the near future and making room for that to happen anyway.

I don't expect to get my first old comb out until probably next spring, but I am actively working to get the comb moving so that I rotate old comb out every couple of years.  Michael Bush may well have something sane to add.

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jgarzasr
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Location: Michigan


« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2009, 08:11:37 AM »

Thanks for all the common sense responses.  Those are great - and definitely gives me the route I plan to take.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2009, 08:26:08 PM »

I'd just pull them when they are dark and empty.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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