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Author Topic: Natural method for controlling Nosema?  (Read 4480 times)
mike s
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« on: March 29, 2009, 02:18:27 AM »

What natural treatments would work for Nosema? Is Fumagilin-B the only recommened option?

Thanks!
Mike
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RayMarler
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2009, 02:21:46 AM »

I've heard others are using essential oils. I may try it this year myself.
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slaphead
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2009, 07:06:31 AM »

Last summers cool, wet weather around Seattle coincided with an apparent widespread outbreak of Nosema-like symptoms.  Friends using vented bottom boards and tops seemed to be less affected than those who used solid bottom boards and/or no vent at the top.  One explanation for this apparent difference is well vented hives maintain low humidity and this in turn moderates the growth of nosema-like pests.  Another trick which seemed to help over wintering in this area last year was to place an extra hive body on top of the inner cover, fill it with old newspaper to absorb moisture and replace the paper as needed, about once a month.  This is a trick introduced to the area by an immigrant from Russia and adopted by a couple of local beekeepers last year.  Their successes over wintering colonies prompted several more to adopt the practice for this winter but we will not know the outcome of those efforts until late April or early May.   I wouldn't class these observations as definitive proof but can see some logic behind them and if the newspaper method holds together this winter will adopt it for my self.

Hope this helps,

SH
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2009, 10:34:15 AM »

Feeding anything (honey, syrup etc.) will clear up Nosema.  The fumadil is just a very expensive addition...

The problem is anything that kills what is living in the bee's gut is going to mess with other things besides Nosema.  There are thousands of organisms that belong in a hive and you will kill many of those with essential oils.

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Michael Bush
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2009, 12:41:54 PM »

I use a tblsp of Cider Vinegar in every gallon of sugar syrup I feed to my bees, been doing it that way for 50 years.  I can't remember the last time I had a case of any kind of Nosema in a hive.  The Scientists say that Cider Vinegar will shorten the life of a honey bee by about 3-4 days.  To me, the choice between having a bee possibly die a few days early over having a case of nosema ravage the entire hive is a no brainer.

It is not Scientifically proven but my own experience says it works.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
mike s
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2009, 05:40:00 PM »

Thanks everyone!
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Chef Isaac
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2009, 08:38:09 AM »

I think there are some things that are misunderstond here. I know it is all opinion but if we look at some of the things in the past, that will give us some answers to shooting some myths down.

Cinder vinegar only helps extend the life of the syrup. Doesnt do anything for the bees. And in reaility, it doesnt really extend the live of the syrup. It just maskes with the smell. You would need a lot of vinegar to increase the acidity in the syrup. It would be better to actually add bleach to the syrup which will help kill the spores in the gut.

The paper method as mentioned above.... this can work but you can just use dry granulated sugar. Sucks up the moistue better then paper plus adds some security from starvation.

Screened bottom boards were proven not to help with nosema.

Michael is right, feeding anything will flush the gut out.

I see a lot of time that beekeepers have a hard time understanding things like nosema. I think of it like if humans had this problem. What would we do? Remember what mom always said? Drink lots of water. Water flushes the system. Same concept with bees. Flush their gut with something!

But, like most things, at the end of the day all that matters is what makes you feel better!
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Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
TwT
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« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2009, 04:33:40 AM »

Remember what mom always said? Drink lots of water. Water flushes the system. Same concept with bees. Flush their gut with something!

Castor Oil, I think essential oils would taste better  Wink
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

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doak
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« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2009, 10:51:02 PM »

I am with TwT, but I haven't fed my bees anything except one almost starved colony some sugar syrup. I did not harvest any honey last year. so what they packed in was what they got going into the winter and coming out this spring. Only that one slipped by. Why, because I read them wrong. They were the biggest and had the most  stores packed going into the winter. But that proved to me the bigger they are the more they eat.

Remember year before last I lost 7 out of 12. I gained 2 of them back last year and lost only one.
That gave me 6 coming into the spring and now I have 10. All going on nectar.
I have already added 1 super each to 3 colonies and getting ready to add another to them and the 4th one.

I have found out the matter or matter not  with a bee colony is mostly what the year brings forth.
What ever you get re guard less of what you do, ---Well we have to live with it.
Whether we do what we think is right or wrong, ---well, again we get what we get.

For me I like my colonies located on high ground where the air can circulate and water runs off good. I get good morning sun then shade from noon till 4 or 5 and then about 50/50.
Night folks :)doak
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