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Author Topic: Facts {and Theories} about trap outs  (Read 13791 times)
iddee
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« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2009, 12:56:40 PM »

My cone is made from 1/8 inch hardware and has an opening large enough for two drones to exit together. If that is what you have, just clean out the bodies and leave it as is. If not, change it.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Luckyparrot
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« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2009, 12:59:49 AM »

Ok, it's been about three weeks since I put the eggs and brood frame in the trap out box. Today I took a look inside the box and saw this :  http://picasaweb.google.com/Luckyparrot2009/Newqueen#
 Can anyone tell from her looks that the queen has mated or still a virgin?
 
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Robo
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« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2009, 07:41:53 AM »

She looks like she may be mated.  Virgins will have a stubby abdomen.  The worker bees around her seem to be paying attention to her as well.  Where a virgin seems to roam around unnoticed.  She is still quite young and I would be optimistic at this point.  She should start laying by the end of week 4.
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Jim 134
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« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2009, 07:33:56 PM »

She looks like she may be mated.  Virgins will have a stubby abdomen.  The worker bees around her seem to be paying attention to her as well.  Where a virgin seems to roam around unnoticed.  She is still quite young and I would be optimistic at this point.  She should start laying by the end of week 4.


   ditto I would look for eggs in about 7-10 days



      BEE HAPPY Jim 134  Smiley
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Luckyparrot
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« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2009, 12:16:43 AM »

 Thank you guys, I'm planning to leave that box there for another three weeks, before removing the cone. I then will post the pictures. Hopefully by that time all the bees will have exited.
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rnotfour
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« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2009, 09:11:47 AM »

I have followed the awesome trap out postings and read through almost all the treads. I have an opportunity to do a trap out that has been in a house for about 3 to 4 years.  By the activity I have observed it looks to be rather large.   I didn't see any one state an optimal time of the year that trap outs are best performed.  If I were to start now it could take some time and see myself running into cold weather and an unsuccessful out come.  Any advise would be appreciated.
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Robo
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« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2009, 09:39:34 AM »

First of all please update your profile with your location, as it helps answers questions better.

In general, my feelings are wait until spring when the population is low.  Or if you want to get the genetics (if they have been feral for 3-4 years, they are obviously excellent survivor stock) I would definitely look heavily into the possibility of doing a cut-out.  If the cutout is truly not feasible, you could attempt to catch a spring swarm and then start the trap-out.  That way you get the genetics and start the trap-out when the population is reduced.  Of course setting swarm traps is no guarantee you will get the swarm.
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rnotfour
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« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2009, 10:34:19 AM »

Sorry Robo, its updated.  Winston Salem NC,  Cut out is out of the question.  Homeowner doesn't want any demolition going on inside the home due to plaster walls.  Bee's have nested in floor joist channel which runs across living room.  They have enjoyed some warm winters.  Smiley
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iddee
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« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2009, 11:04:28 AM »

In the floor of the living room or in the ceiling, under the second story room? That will make a big difference.

BTW, I am 35 mile from you.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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rnotfour
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« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2009, 11:40:18 AM »

In the living room ceiling under a 2nd story bedroom.  If pictures would help I can post them?
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iddee
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« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2009, 12:07:57 PM »

You can post the "before" pics, here are the "after" pics...   grin   evil





That makes it much harder. I recommend waiting until spring. If they have been there 2 or 3 years, one more winter won't hurt. Removing them now would be disastrous.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
rnotfour
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« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2009, 12:32:26 PM »

Thanks that one looked like fun mine is probably a similar situation.  I will wait until spring.  It will probably depend on the weather but when would you plan to start the trap out given our areas climate?  You presented at our Forsyth Bee Association, great presentation.  It is nice to have beekeepers like you willing to share information to us just starting out.  Thanks for your insight.   
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iddee
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« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2009, 01:51:11 PM »

Yep, you've got me pegged. I enjoyed the meeting. You have a lot of good people in your club.
I would start the trap with the first sighting of a drone in the spring, on the morning of a day forecast to be sunny and above 60 degrees.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Meadlover
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« Reply #33 on: February 04, 2010, 04:43:11 PM »

Great thread iddee!

I have just completed my 1st trapout thanks to your trapout threads and it all went very smoothly due to the very in depth information that you have compiled in here, so thanks for putting in the effort to help so many of us   Smiley

My question is - can I use a queen-right hive as the trapout box?
I'm assuming it will be OK as the returning foragers will have lost the scent (or almost lost the scent) of their queen, and will therefore join the trapout queen-right hive. Is my theory correct or flawed?

Thanks

ML
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iddee
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« Reply #34 on: February 04, 2010, 10:18:17 PM »

I have only tried it once. I had a hive that only had one frame of bees and a queen. When I removed the first box with queen cells, I put it on the trap. It worked fine and the hive prospered. I haven't tried a free ranging queen on the beginning of a trap. If you do, please post how it works. My guess is it will work fine, but only a few live tests will tell for sure.

Thanks for the kudos. I'm glad it worked for you.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Meadlover
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« Reply #35 on: February 04, 2010, 10:37:52 PM »

What I found most useful about your trapout guides is WHY to do what you do. Once I understand the theory of what's going on everything makes sense and I can then apply that knowledge to other beekeeping scenarios. The photos were also really good.

Well, I guess I will get back to everyone in the next few weeks on how a trapout goes with a queen-right hive  Undecided
This is what I have done:
Did my 1st trapout which now has a laying queen.
Started my 2nd trapout using the hive from my 1st trapout.

ML
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wmoze
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« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2010, 10:59:02 AM »

I'm a newbie and have a dumb question on trap outs grin.  I found a wild hive in the tank of an old (1929?) ford pickup that is rusting in the woods near my place.  I've just started keeping bees this year and was interested in trying to trap the wild hive to add to my current hives.  I'm interested in trying to get the queen and was wondering if I had a setup where the bees went though a hive I attach to their entrance with a queen excluder so only the workers could come and go.  Would the queen eventually move into my hive when she trys to abscond and finds out she can't get out? 
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iddee
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« Reply #37 on: July 10, 2010, 12:04:36 PM »

Try it and report back. No one has made a repeatable success of it that way yet. You may be the first.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
wmoze
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« Reply #38 on: July 10, 2010, 07:20:08 PM »

Have you or anyone else you know tried anything like that before?  Do you think I have time this year yet to do a trap out or should I wait until next spring to try it?  If others have already tried it in vain then I'll pass on the extra time and work.  Thanks again for taking the time to respond!
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iddee
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« Reply #39 on: July 10, 2010, 07:36:00 PM »

I know a lot of folks have tried the cone in hive method, with many failures. The workers return to the house entrance, or base of cone, rather than the hive box. I don't know about the excluder.

Whether it would live through the winter has too many variables. Number of bees trapped, fall flow, quality of queen, amount fed, weather, ETC.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
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