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Author Topic: Materials for a trap out  (Read 10392 times)
iddee
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« Reply #40 on: November 03, 2011, 08:01:19 AM »

Shane, you are correct. Yes, one frame of brood with eggs and the rest foundation will work.
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« Reply #41 on: November 03, 2011, 08:02:05 AM »

You need EGGS so that they can make a new queen in hive on the outside of the trap.   One frame is sufficient.  You usually can't get a frame with just eggs,  but can get a mixed frame of brood and eggs.  

My preferred method is to take one frame of brood (with eggs) and put it in the trap hive as close to the base of the trap cone as possible (usually all the way to the side of the hive that touches the wall of the house) and then fill the remainder of the hive with 9 frames of foundation (assuming using a full size trap hive).
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ShaneJ
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« Reply #42 on: November 03, 2011, 08:05:04 AM »

Thank you guys. Much appreciated.

My only concern now is finding some eggs in my current hive. I'm very nervous about this part.

Shane
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Shane
iddee
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« Reply #43 on: November 03, 2011, 08:09:36 AM »

The only thing you should be nervous about is insuring you don't get your queen. If it is warm on the morning you do it, you can shake off most the bees from the frame.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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« Reply #44 on: November 03, 2011, 06:26:30 PM »

Getting the queen was the second thing I was nervous about. I was planing on spotting her on a frame really quickly and then grabbing another perfect frame with a good mix of eggs and brood. rolleyes Undecided I wish..
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Shane
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« Reply #45 on: November 03, 2011, 06:49:38 PM »

If you can spot her and set her aside, that is the safest.  If you can't find her than do your best to thoroughly examine the frame you want to take (study both sides of the frame at least 2 times)  then shake the bees off,  examine one more time and then put it into your trap out hive.
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Meadlover
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« Reply #46 on: November 03, 2011, 08:35:00 PM »

Shane,

I have only ever just put 1 frame in my tapouts (with open brood & eggs, no bees).

Because it is right next door you are at such an advantage with this trapout!
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ShaneJ
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« Reply #47 on: November 03, 2011, 09:01:17 PM »

Thanks.

Lets just hope that my advantage means success. Smiley
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Shane
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« Reply #48 on: November 03, 2011, 10:10:33 PM »

Actually, there is also a disadvantage with it being so close.   Once you have completed the trap out,  you will need to find a place to move the hive for a couple of weeks that is more than 2 miles away.   Moving them a few hundred feet doesn't work so well,  unless you do it a foot at a time.
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ShaneJ
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« Reply #49 on: November 03, 2011, 10:16:25 PM »

Is that right? This is definitely the case with my native bees but didn't know the foreign bees were the same. Thanks for letting me know.
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Shane
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« Reply #50 on: September 02, 2014, 01:29:39 PM »

Quote
One frame of brood and EGGS. Yes, I capitalized EGGS.

Hey guys, pardon me if this has been addressed in more detail and I missed it, but . . .
when setting up a trapout and using a frame of brood and eggs, do you want to include some nurse bees to tend to the eggs and brood? Or will that cause a conflict with the new bees that will be moving into the new trap hive?

I've been successful without adding nurse bees, but the temps are rather high down here in south Texas this time of the year, so I thought the nurse bees may be helpful, but didn't want to start a fight among the unrelated/strange bees.

Thanks,
GD
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iddee
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« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2014, 02:00:17 PM »

I have used queenright nucs for the catchbox, and used frames with eggs without nurse bees, so I would say it doesn't matter. Either way works.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
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« Reply #52 on: September 02, 2014, 02:09:42 PM »

Okay, good deal. Thanks for the speedy reply!
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jayj200
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« Reply #53 on: September 25, 2014, 12:13:09 PM »

First stupid question, how do you make your cones and keep them from unraveling?


...JP


I use cone glue. we keep it with propwash
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