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Author Topic: Do I Need A Hive Top Feeder?  (Read 5814 times)
Lord BuzzALot
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« on: February 16, 2005, 12:25:50 PM »

Do i need a hive top feeder for the colony of bees I am going to get in April? I have a Langstroth Poly hive for them at the moment.
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Finman
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2005, 12:50:59 PM »

Quote from: BeeBoy
Do i need a hive top feeder for the colony of bees I am going to get in April? I have a Langstroth Poly hive for them at the moment.


Are you in England, South Middle?...Where? From Independent Scotland?

When you get the hive, do you have spring there and fruit trees blooming?

It depend how much hive has food and how much they get food from outdoors.

The hive is little, there is no need to fill it with sugar. It need all empty combs for eggs.
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2005, 01:13:32 PM »

You will want to feed them sugar water, but what type of feeder you use is up to you (when doing spring feeding that is). A hive top feeder is easier to fill since you don't have to open the hive all the way up. But you could use a frame feeder or an entrance feeder if you like.

Beth
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2005, 08:05:03 PM »

Hey beeboy,  I think the wisest feeder to use would be the hive top feeder. They hold alot of sugar water and and are pretty safe for the bees. Another thing that is good is that you dont have to open the hive as often setting back production and your sugarwater dosnt get cooked by the sun or mass drowning by frame feeders. bye Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
Lord BuzzALot
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2005, 06:00:58 AM »

Thanks. By the way I am from South-East england.
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BigRog
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« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2005, 06:04:42 AM »

Frame feeders can be real drowning pools.
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2005, 07:20:21 AM »

Sorry Roger, but I disagree. I know lots of people say that, but I place a thin board in there and might have 1 or 2 die - that's it. Maybe if I didn't do the board for them to crawl on it would be different.

Beth
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Bee Boy
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« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2005, 03:25:00 PM »

You can also toss a bunch of those packing peanuts in the frame feeders. Its a good use for them. I prefer the hive top feeder myself, because you don't have to open the whole hive to refill it.
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Bee Boy
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« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2005, 04:01:52 PM »

Quote from: Beth Kirkley
Sorry Roger, but I disagree. I know lots of people say that, but I place a thin board in there and might have 1 or 2 die - that's it. Maybe if I didn't do the board for them to crawl on it would be different.

Beth


No,  Sorry Beth, but Rog is right cheesy   It CAN be a real drawning pool, unless you take measures to prevent it. cheesy  cheesy
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Anonymous
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« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2005, 05:45:54 PM »

I fully agree with Beth on this issue. She did say to add a float. I modified mine and they work just fine with the first mod. But I did some more mods and made them better yet. The only thing I like better is the gallon pickle Jars. All to true what people say about frame feeders drowning bees and I my self don't understand why the MFG'S haven't did the mods them selves so they work better. With the boardman feeders many keepers say they promote robbing but if the proper steps are taken it isn't a problem. I have also heard of a drowning problem with certin  brands of hive top feeders.

My first mods with a float and anti bulge wire ties.



Screen on the sides for the bees to climb out on.


Second mod with wooden blocks for bulge controll and slim wire rods for floats to ride up and down on. Placed in a deep with insulation on each side allowed the bee to use them during the winter and they didn't take up frame space in ther brood chamber.
I have showed my mods to other beekkepers and six now use them Like I do.



 Cheesy  Al
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2005, 11:46:14 PM »

I am going to stick with my hive top feeders, bye Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2005, 11:49:34 PM »

Quote
I am going to stick with my hive top feeders, bye Very Happy


Did you build them yourself?

The ones I've seen are $20-$40 apiece, and wilth 6 or 7 hives this summer, that's real money!  My two hives last summer seemed fine with boardman entrace feeders. I did buy frame feeders with floats, too, but didn't have a chance to try them.

I like the idea of hive top, but the price is pretty steep...
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Lesli
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2005, 11:53:16 PM »

I know that most of you are all hobby keepers and are on a budget but I am lucky enough not to have to put up with that problem. My funds are not limited and if I can prove I need it or it would make easier work I can buy it. bye  Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2005, 11:57:04 PM »

Lesli,
Have you tried the inverted pickle jar inside an empty super approach yet? This will still allow you to keep your syrup out of the sunlight to protect any medications you might add, and will keep robbers away because it is inside the hive. The disadvantage over the 20-40$ models is capacity and ease of filling. You don't have to disturb the girls to add more syrup to the commercial types, just take off the inner cover and dump more syrup in! Cheesy
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golfpsycho
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2005, 12:06:07 AM »

Geat top feeders are just gallon jars inverted either over the frames or over the inner cover.   It doesn't cost alot of money to gather them up from a deli, or pizza parlor, or wherever they use them.  You certainly don't need to spend 40 or 50 bucks each for them, unless your spending someone elses money.. then by all means.. get the ones the catalogues offer.

Bees just aren't that particular.  They don't care if it is an old pickle jar, tomato sauce jar, or polystyrene feeder from mann lake.  They want the syrup, however and wherever they can get it.
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Lesli
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« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2005, 12:08:27 AM »

I haven't tried that yet, because the girls were so gentle all summer--and the fall flow from goldenrod was so good- that I didn't need an alternative. But I'm considering everythig for the future.

When you use the gallon jars, other than putting a super around the, how do you keep them balanced? Aren't they likely to tip?
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Lesli
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2005, 01:37:09 AM »

like I said, I think I will stay with my HTF. I dont want to take up space on the inside with a FF and am not using exterior feeders no matter what. bye Smiley
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2005, 02:48:51 AM »

I'm trying this Beemax Top Feeder this year, but i still like my entrance feeders

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« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2005, 08:28:47 AM »

Quote from: golfpsycho
Geat top feeders are just gallon jars inverted either over the frames or over the inner cover.   It doesn't cost alot of money to gather them up from a deli, or pizza parlor, or wherever they use them.  You certainly don't need to spend 40 or 50 bucks each for them, unless your spending someone elses money.. then by all means.. get the ones the catalogues offer.

Bees just aren't that particular.  They don't care if it is an old pickle jar, tomato sauce jar, or polystyrene feeder from mann lake.  They want the syrup, however and wherever they can get it.


WHAT!!!!!!  are you crazy.......   Unless you can buy it called "bee feeder" at a premium price you can't use it.   Get with the times will you......

That's all right,  while our bees are feeding because their bees haven't found their "bee feeder" or it is too cold for theirs to journey off to the "bee feeder" ours are feeding 24/7 and will reap the benefits.   That's OK, I don't miss having to paint my feeder, or clean it (mine is dishwasher safe wink )  and I can live without impressing my friends with a "bee feeder".
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Anonymous
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« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2005, 08:56:12 AM »

Smiley Just as I said im my post I do prefer the one gallon pickle jar. I have a pizza polar that calls me about twice a month when they have two or three on hand to come pick them up. I also have a local odd fellows club that saves the ones from the once a month dinners they have to come get them. All for the price of the fuel to drive and get them, they even have washed them, Of course a heartful thank you too.

I take a 1"x6"x15" and cut a hole in it the size of the lid with the saber saw. Then I found I loked a 2"x6"x8" with the hole drilled nearly thru with a hole saw the size of the lid then cut the drilled a bit smaller on the other side and X channals cut with a router so they can get to the many holes in the lid and not just the ones in the inter cover slot
 Cheesy  Al
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