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Author Topic: Did I feed too much too early?  (Read 909 times)
derrick1p1
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« on: February 23, 2009, 10:33:36 AM »

Most of my 5 hives went into winter light.  I fed when warm enough and put dry sugar above the clusters as added measure.
I checked hives briefly this weekend (temp about 60 degrees) to check health.  All had good amount of brood.  VERY strong numbers, brood already in lower chambers, brood on 90% of frames in deep and medium above.  Little stores. 

Should I continue feeding.  I think most do not have enough stores to rear this brood.  I don't want them to starve, but don't want to encourage anymore unatural "flows" to induce brood if they shouldn't be this full yet.

Feed or not to feed?

Thanks,
Derrick
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sc-bee
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« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2009, 11:06:11 AM »

>I think most do not have enough stores to rear this brood.

Feed if you think they need it. Good time to loose bees from starvation inm our pert of country. Especially if already feeding and alot of brood prsent. If not enough bees to cover brood will chill. We stilll have a little cold weather left as you know.

Downside as you know feed to much and they may end up in the trees early---- after temps warm up do an inspection and give them room if they need it.
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iddee
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« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2009, 11:10:25 AM »

Feed, Feed, Feed, but add boxes if needed. DO NOT let them run out of food or space. You can manage swarm prevention easier than deadouts.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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jdpro5010
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« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2009, 02:08:26 PM »

I would feed for sure.  Worry about swarming later.  I would think the girls would be building up in your area anyhow.
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carolina bee
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« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2009, 02:09:31 PM »

Try --without opening the hive-- pick-up the back of the hive ( easy!! ). You can tell by the weight whether there is enough food stored. It's not fool proof but it keeps you from having to open the hive on a cool day. Then feed what you need to and not what you think you have to. Overfeeding will cause       them to become honeybound. Also I use a thin syrup ( 5 qts to 2 1/2lb of surgar) with a type of honey bee healthy to stimulate brood production and breakdown of the stored honey to give the queen more places to lay. It seems to work for me.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2009, 02:10:38 PM »

>You can manage swarm prevention easier than deadouts.

iddee--- I agree Wink
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justgojumpit
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« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2009, 02:26:01 PM »

you could also feed now, and then take a nuc or two off of this hive when you start to see swarm cells.  it seems like you have a very early start to the season, which is a wonderful thing if you manage it properly.  If you continue feeding, you may find yourself with two or more extra hives without hurting honey production.  If you stop feeding, you may find yourself without any bees!

justgojumpit
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derrick1p1
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« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2009, 09:51:02 AM »

Thanks for the advice!
I'm feeding them, because stores are so low, a result of the large amount of brood.  I agree, better to manage swarming, or get another hive out of this one than have a dead out. 
Derrick
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I won't let grass grow under my feet, there will be plenty of time to push up daisies.
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