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Author Topic: MidSummer into Fall plants  (Read 1671 times)
pollenchucker
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42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« on: February 21, 2009, 05:19:04 PM »

Hi, I'm new.  I live in southern part of N.C., just moved here recently.  I know we have many spring flowers and trees that produce some excellent honey, about 50 acres of Tulip Poplars in particular in our swamp lands.  What I'm wondering about is what I can add to our property to help sustain the bees through the summer doldrums.  We often have drought here in the summer and not too many flowering plants that I am aware of.  Of course I am not very well educated on what the bees will be able to find here on their own.  So I was thinking of adding some plants that would be beneficial during this particularly hot period.  My first thought is to add some pond Hyacinth and Lillies to our pond.  Its about a 5 acre pond but lillies are pretty expensive so right now I have a list of about 6 or so.  They are listed as hardies which means they will regenerate each year instead of just being annuals.  Also I am considering planting about a half acre of buckwheat for fall.  Haven't found a source for it yet though, but I havent started looking yet either.  We have some good farm seed stores around so I'm hoping one can hook me up.  So do I need more than this or should I consider adding something else or any thing in particular?
thanks
-pollenchucker
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2009, 06:04:35 PM »

Don't put pond hyacinths in that big of a pond! They're invasive, I think imported from Asia, and bees don't work them.

There are some Asters that bloom in mid summer and continue into fall. Clethra alnifolia blooms at about that time I think but it's short lived, smells amazing though. Some of the smaller goldenrods bloom at that time too. The 2' one followed by 4' and on their way up. My 13' variety doesn't bloom until the very end of fall. I want to say Sumac (The Winged Sumac at least) is blooming it's lime green flowers around then too.
Pretty much everything else that flowers then would be flowering already from the early summer. You could plant a late crop of sunflowers.
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pollenchucker
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42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2009, 06:10:48 PM »

Well thank you, I will discard the hyacinths from my plan and consider some of the land plants you mentioned.  But I'm still looking for some pond plants besides the lillies to use that are worth consideration.
-pc
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2009, 06:20:57 PM »

Button Bush might work. It usually grows near water but I don't know if it's still blooming in the fall. Fire Weed is another one.

Purple loosestrife is an awful invasive that will take over the pond so Don't Plant that please. It look similar to Fire Weed but isn't native.

I'm sure there must be more water plants. Do Sea Hollies bloom that late?
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BEH
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2009, 04:58:13 PM »

There is a great site someone showed me a while back [ftp/http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollen_source/ftp]
 It's about pollen but also lists bloom times. If you click on the plant name it will give you details on species and growth/habitat . According to it all of the following bloom in late summer-fall:

Bluebeard Aug-Sept
Chives May-Sept
Garlic Chives Aug-Sept
Borage June- Frost
Calendula(Pot Marigold) June- Sept
Heather July-Aug
Yellow Star Thistle July-Sept
Spotted Knapweed July-Sept
Melons/Pumpkins June-Frost
Fireweed July-Aug
Joe Pye Weed Aug-Sept
Mallow June-Sept
Smart Weed Aug-Sept
Chinese Elm
Sweet Autumn Clematis
Ivy Sept-Oct

I think I am going to look for some Fireweed seeds myself.
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Natalie
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2009, 09:29:06 PM »

I know my anise hyssops were still blooming late summer and I know for sure I had several here blooming in the beginning of september.
I have bee balm that I think blooms in midsummer as well.
There are quite a bit, Cindi has a thread here on all the best bee plants.
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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2009, 05:04:10 PM »

Natalie.  Go out when the hyssops are beginning to grow nicely.  Take some tip cuttings, root them in the soil (they root so easily and have a great set of roots in about 2 weeks).  Plant these little cuttings after the last frost. 

I say this because.....

The mother plants will bloom from beginning of July (I would imagine that most areas are pretty much the same), until late fall.  You can extend the growing season of the hyssops with the young cuttings.  THey will begin to bloom (guaranteed the first year) about 2 weeks after the mother plants have began to bloom.  When the mother plants are finished blooming, these baby plants will continue on right until the frost kill.  It extends the season of the hyssop and then you have even more the next year.  The cutting hyssops make pretty big plants the first year.  Did you ever see the thread that I had going on about the hyssops (and pictures?).  I will get that thread for you, just in case.  Have a most beautiful and wonderful day, loving and livin' this great life of ours.  Cindi

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,7732.0.html



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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Natalie
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« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2009, 05:33:34 PM »

Cindi thanks so much for that information! Hyssops are one of my favorite plants, that and poppies.
I have been adding more of both whenever I can so this will help me out a great deal.
Thanks again.
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2009, 05:42:58 PM »

Natalie, any questions about propogation, etc., lean on me, I think that I know alot, smiling.  Been in the nursery business for many years in my own business (now retired from that field, smiling).  Beautiful day, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
pollenchucker
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42 days and their wings fall off, eh?


« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2009, 07:18:25 PM »

Been traveling out of town and havent checked in, in a while.  I think I have a pretty good batch of plants ordered already but will definitely look into the ones mentioned by you folks.  Thanks. 
I have borage, buckwheat, sweet clover, yellow blossom clover, birdsfoot trefoil, lavender, sweet basil, and meadow sweet. These are just intended for summer through fall.  We have plenty of tulip poplars and fruit trees around here in the spring.
Edit: I also just added hyssop and anise hyssop as well as marigolds.  Plus we will have a variety of brasicas in our fall veggie garden.  I think I'm done for now, thanks again.
-pc
« Last Edit: March 08, 2009, 02:54:04 PM by pollenchucker » Logged
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