Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 20, 2014, 07:46:39 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Horseradish and Rhubarb growers?  (Read 6177 times)
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2008, 05:17:59 PM »

KONASDAD,

The one's on ebay would be 5 dollars each. So 5 times 5 is $25.00 Shipping for the first is $5.00 with $2.50 for each additional set. So shipping for 5 is $15.00. The total for 5 roots plus shipping would be $40.00

I can go to many garden centers or known plant/garden order places, like Johnny's  ( www.Johnnyseeds.com ) and pay far less.

I actually like to barter, trade, take clipping, or dig up unwanted plants as I come across them. 
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2008, 06:05:43 PM »

Nope, trust no one, hee, hee.  Get the roots from Brian, both of you (that means you Konasdad). Get the roots from a trusted, tried and true source.  I can vouch for Brian, that everything that he grows, be it green in the ground or many colours above the ground, they are all grown organically and have the best of care, hee, hee.  Trust Brian's roots (or mine, if I could get them across the border) only.....and don't pay for this kind of stuff (other than if Brian would like a little bit for the postage, but I really think that would not be very much money).  Beautiful day in this great life, love this life, and great health wishes for us all. Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2240


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2008, 08:24:00 AM »

I saw them in Meijers last week.  They were really nice roots about
1 1/2" X 10" long.  As for planting them right side up Cindi.  Why not just plant them horizontal.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2008, 10:46:43 AM »

As for planting them right side up Cindi.  Why not just plant them horizontal.

Dan, what a dashing idea!!!  Never thought of that.  Sometimes one cannot see the sky through the woods.  There probably is no reason whatsoever why they can't be planted any which way, just never thought about it.  The roots will grow downwards regardless of how the mother root is planted for surely.  You have instilled some deep thoughts here, thanks, hee, hee, just what I need, more things to ponder, hee, hee, smiling.  Oh no, the more I think about it, the more I am thinking about it, eeks!!!!  Have a most wonderful, awesome and great day, health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
David LaFerney
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 924


Location: Cookeville, TN - U.S.A.


WWW
« Reply #24 on: February 05, 2009, 09:55:51 PM »

I like the sour cream idea Brian.  I'll have to try that next year.  As for getting a root to start a new patch,  I'm wondering if one bought at the local meijers store would grow.  For someone that want to start a patch and cant find a pc of root it would be worth a try.  The roots that i see at our meijers are large enough to make a small jar and still have enough to through a few pc's in the ground.   

I started mine with a root from the grocery store planted in early spring - but I'd say you could bury it any time of year and it would grow.  By the way, it's a member of the mustard family, and you can eat the leaves (young tender ones being best) either raw or cooked.
Logged

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

Putting the "ape" in apiary since 2009.
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15069


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #25 on: February 05, 2009, 10:48:27 PM »

cindi and brian, do you lift your horseradish root with a pitchfork in the fall?  my grandmother taught me that.  it breaks the root and causes it to spread...not that it need much help, but that gives you new, young root to  to eat each year.  i have some that is great, but it is getting out of hand. 

Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2009, 11:03:43 AM »

Kathy, nope.  I just dig out hunks of it whenever I want it.  In the spring I dig out the centre quite often and disgard the really thick root, it seems that it is pretty woody, I like to use the more thinner pieces.  I don't bother to try to get more roots to grow, if anything I am trying to prevent them from spreading too far from the mother spot.  I am sure that your Grandmother was wise with what she did and made some nice tender roots.  Have a great and most wonderful day, health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2009, 11:06:04 AM »

cindi and brian, do you lift your horseradish root with a pitchfork in the fall?  my grandmother taught me that.  it breaks the root and causes it to spread...not that it need much help, but that gives you new, young root to  to eat each year.  i have some that is great, but it is getting out of hand. 

Horseradish is like Comphry in that it spreads like wildfire from the root.  When harvesting even a small piece of root left behind will start a whole new plant.  Over time you plant can become a huge plot.  I've found that about the only way to eradicate it is to dig and sift the ground at least 2 feet deep and 1 foot wider than the size of the patch.  This works on most root sprouting plants.  
A few frag,emts cam be saved amd replanted where desired.  This type of extensive root harvesting needs to be done about every 5 years or it really gets out of hand.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15069


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2009, 11:10:24 AM »

Quote
I am sure that your Grandmother was wise with what she did and made some nice tender roots.

she also dumped the chamber pot on the tomatoes.  good for the tomatoes, but not a gardening tip you want to share with company over dinner.  and sorry...it was my great-grandmother.  smiley

i'll get my first good harvest from my horseradish this year.  as for the rhubarb, i have been trying to kill the stuff for years and it keeps coming back. plant must be 100 years old and it just won't die.  i hate the stuff!!

Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2009, 11:20:39 AM »

Kathy, oh!!!  Yes, I have heard time and time again about the contents of what was in the chamber pot to be put into the soil around the tomatoes  evil rolleyes cheesy cool.  They THRIVE on that acidy stuff, smiling, she was a wise woman, have that great, most wonderful day, life, health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.334 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 24, 2014, 10:53:08 AM