Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: starting anew  (Read 1064 times)

Offline Bee1

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 81
  • Gender: Female
  • 1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007
starting anew
« on: February 08, 2009, 02:24:14 PM »
Hello BeeKeep’s. 

I’m soliciting suggestions and advice.   

My bees (single hive) did not make it through winter; which of course breaks my heart, however, I would like to try again.  And this time, if I can manage it, I may try to establish 2 hives, we’ll see. 

Question.  Regarding the deep hive body, and the supers, can I keep & reuse the comb and comb with honey or should I start over with all fresh?  The reason for the failure is unknown to me. 

I looked in the hive yesterday and right now I didn't see an insect problem....  but without any bees and the weather warming I’m afraid moths and etc will become a problem quickly....  What do I do? Is there a way to manage this until I can round up some new bees?

Thanks all. 

Bee1

ps.  I haven't been on in awhile but it is so nice to know you are out there. 
Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.

Offline HAB

  • HEAVENLY BEEKEEPER
  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 622
Re: starting anew
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2009, 03:31:53 PM »
Put the frames in your freezer.  Just be very careful when you move them cold, for they will be very fragile.
Then clean and freshen up your hive for the New Bees.  Maybe relocate to a sunnier location and, if you wish or its needed, repaint.
When you get your new Bees just get out the old frames thaw and allow to reach room temperature or warmer and put them in the Hive.  Then Hive the Bees.
DO NOT put Bees onto frozen frames.
Wishing you great success. :)

Offline sc-bee

  • Super Bee
  • *****
  • Posts: 2117
Re: starting anew
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2009, 03:32:23 PM »
Keep the drawn frames and store them with wax moth protection. Freeze the honey frames and thaw them when you are ready top use.

Good Luck!!!

I see HAB beat me too the draw by about a minute :-D!
John 3:16

Offline kathyp

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 15491
  • Gender: Female
Re: starting anew
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2009, 03:39:07 PM »
when you freeze the honey frames, put wax paper between them.  it will keep them from sticking and catch any drips.  when you thaw them, they won't make such a mess.
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline Pond Creek Farm

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 566
  • Gender: Male
Re: starting anew
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2009, 07:43:17 PM »
Same thing happened with one of my hives.  I put all twenty deep frames of comb, honey and pollen right into the freezer.  I am planning on putting two of the three packages I have coming on these frames to give them a head start. I strongly encourage you to get two hives (at least).  I have learned much by watching differences in hives.  When I had only one, I never knew if there was a problem because I had no point of reference.
Brian

Offline Brian D. Bray

  • Galactic Bee
  • ******
  • Posts: 7369
  • Gender: Male
  • I really look like this, just ask Cindi.
    • http://spaces.msn.com/thecoonsden
Re: starting anew
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2009, 08:34:59 PM »
Divide the frames you have, honey and comb, between the hives you plan to establish.  So if you get 3 packages, for instance, then divide everything into 3 boxes as close to even as possible.  That will give each hive an equal start and with honey and comb the bees have already been fed and the queen has a place to begin laying.  If you have dead bee, mold, etc on the frames don't worry, the bees will clean them up pronto.

Remove the frames from the freezer at least 3 days prior to putting into the hive to make sure they are completely thawed.
Life is a school.  What have you learned?   :brian:      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!

Offline rast

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 553
  • Gender: Male
Re: starting anew
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2009, 10:06:55 PM »
 "when you freeze the honey frames, put wax paper between them. "
 Pay attention to Kathy's advice on that. Speriance is speakin.
Fools argue; wise men discuss.
    --Paramahansa Yogananda

Offline Bee1

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 81
  • Gender: Female
  • 1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007
Re: starting anew
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2009, 02:58:36 PM »
thanks folks.

I can put most of the honey combs in the freezer.. however space is limited.  I only have my kitchen freezer...  (i will use wax paper tween)

and regarding "wax moth protection" for the drawn frames..  certan?? chemicals...  i've done a site search and am checking out the options and hope I can put something together..  I may just have to rotate the frames through the  freezer..

bee good, ya'll,   i'm going to go and try and clear some space in the freezer.
ciao -



 
Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.

Offline rast

  • Field Bee
  • ***
  • Posts: 553
  • Gender: Male
Re: starting anew
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2009, 10:14:34 PM »
 As far as wax moth larva damage,  Bt aizawai has worked for me so far for super storage. I still see some moths when checking them (this past Sat.), but no larva or webbing.
Fools argue; wise men discuss.
    --Paramahansa Yogananda