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Author Topic: Queen not laying I think  (Read 933 times)
orvette1
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« on: February 07, 2009, 09:24:44 PM »

I started a nuc with a new queen and some brood and nurse bees from another hive.  This was about 2 months ago. I check them about once a week. I saw the queen today, but only about 4-8 larvae. THe bees don't seem to be drawing out the comb either.  There was some capped brood. I can't see the eggs, never have been able to. There may be eggs, but I can't tell.  Any ideas?
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2009, 09:45:24 PM »

I started a nuc with a new queen and some brood and nurse bees from another hive.  This was about 2 months ago. I check them about once a week. I saw the queen today, but only about 4-8 larvae. THe bees don't seem to be drawing out the comb either.  There was some capped brood. I can't see the eggs, never have been able to. There may be eggs, but I can't tell.  Any ideas?

Imagine a very small grain of rice balanced on its end.  Now, with the sun over your shoulder hold the frame so that the sun shines down into the comb.  You should see those little grains of rice centered in the cell.  Also look for the later stage of the larva laying on its side in a small pool of white milk like substance (royal jelly).
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orvette1
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2009, 09:53:19 PM »

Thank you.  I had a beekeeper come out and show me how to look for eggs, I just can't see them. Even with my glasses on.  Any ideas on why she isn't laying? Any ideas on how to get her going? Any ideas on how to get the bees to draw comb?
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2009, 10:06:49 PM »

what is your flow like?  if she's not laying and they aren't drawing comb, i'd wonder if they are getting enough of the right stuff to eat.  also, do you have enough workers? 
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2009, 10:56:26 PM »

A few questions:
1. What type of foundation are you using?
2. Are you feeding pollen patties or syrup?
3. Have you added more bees/frames to boost the dwindling population?
4. Is the comb honey bound from being over fed?
5. What types of forage are you bees working at the moment?
6. Are you using a nuc of full size hive body?
7. How are your other hives/splits performing?

Answer those questions and I'll give a more precise answer to your question as it lacking information to be more than general at the moment.  In other words I'd have to guess at one of a dozen possibilities.
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2009, 10:57:26 PM »

Have you tried holding up a magnyfying lens to see into the cells? What's your weather been like? No nectar available, no pollen available they will build slowwwly. They usually can find pollen though.

Have you offered feed? If no flow, feed them and they will more than likely draw comb.


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orvette1
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2009, 10:35:00 AM »

Thank you all for your info. I think I know what the problem is.  Smiley
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kathyp
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« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2009, 10:57:58 AM »

care to share??  smiley
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
orvette1
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« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2009, 10:33:17 PM »

I have a strong hive also.  They drew out the comb and filled it with honey very fast.  The queen is working hard, I don't like her, but that is a different problem.  So I thought the nuc should be doing well also.  Here in Honolulu we don't have much of a problem with nectar flow or pollen.  The same thing kept coming up in the answers, and I kind of thought I might need to feed them.  So I am going to start. Thank everyone!
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