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Author Topic: Hi from New Zealand  (Read 2020 times)
Newbee
New Bee
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Location: New Zealand


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« on: February 13, 2005, 05:36:21 AM »

I am another newbie who does not yet have bees - well sort of dont and sort of do embarassed
We live on 10 acres in central New Zealand and have a hive on the property that belongs to the man we bought our land from. He had a lot of hives here before we bought , and we were happy for him to leave some as they were not in our way and were in a good position.
Unfortunately though, they have not been looked after, and all but one had died, and we had no end of trouble with swarms taking up residence in our parrots breeding boxes - right in the middle of nesting.
We have lost in the vicinity of $5000 worth of parrot chicks in 3 years because of the unattended hives.
I want to learn to keep my own bees, and how to look after the remaining one that is camping here, for production of honey for the kitchen, for feeding to my gecko collection, and for increasing pollination throughout our gardens. We have a large garden with lots of flowering trees to support NZ native birds throughout the seasons so should be able to provide for some happy bees. Our neighbouring property is a dairy run off, so has acres of clover for bees to forage in as well.
I am a huge fan of Honey mead and am lucky to be reasonably close to a store that sells a huge range of the best ever meads and liqueurs. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM wink
I have done a lot of reading at Beemaster.com and have learned so much there, and am keen to learn more.
Today I discovered that there is a 6 week course about to start at our local high school for newbee and wannabee beekeepers, so will be booking myself into that sometime tomorrow. It is to be run by the honey mead shop man, so will be entertaining as well as informative - he is a great and enthusiastic ambassador for his trade.
Thanks heaps for having me here
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Beth Kirkley
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Location: Eastman, Georgia


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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2005, 07:42:20 AM »

Good to have you join.

So you say that hive hasn't been looked over in years, and surviving & swarming well, huh? Sounds like to me that you have a good start for beekeeping - strong genetics. I'd imagine, if you can manipulate things a bit so it works to your advantage, you'd do well. By manipulate, I'm just thinking - swarm control, and establishing new hives with growing colonies. But since they haven't been tended to, they seem to have developed strong mite resistance and such. Even though getting into that hive and cleaning it up so it's workable will be a chore, it sounds well worth it. I wonder how their personality is? Are they agressive?

Beth
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Newbee
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2005, 05:44:12 PM »

Sorry Beth, didnt really explain the chain of events well enough. There were a number of hives some years ago and they have dwindled down to just the one that is here now. Over the years there have been many swarms and one by one the hives shut themselves down. (you will have to excuse my descriptions and terminology- not up with the play yet embarassed ).
There was just one hive left and that became dormant after a year or so, but has had a new queen put in it after we told the guy that it too had become defunct. It sat unused for several months and he came and added the new queen (I think it was a gathered swarm but not 100% sure) one day while we were out at work and its now quite a busy little hive.
Having said that, he has not been to check it for weeks so far as we know, so our fear is that history will repeat and one day we will notice no activity and the hive will once again be failing. Point being that if I can learn to recognise what is happening and how to do something about it myself, we might avoid the worst.
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2005, 09:46:08 PM »

Ohhhh.... ok...... gottcha! Smiley

Well, good luck then might be a better response.

Beth Smiley
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RayJay24
New Bee
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Location: New Zealand


« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2005, 11:51:30 PM »

Hi There Newbee - we must be neighbours I'm thinking cheesy

Interesting place to start beekeeping from - almost a reluctant keeper rather than a hobby for you?    Sveral of my neighbours have kept bees in the past, and I have the opportunity to acquire two hives from one guy whose eyesight is failing and hasnt the time any more.  However, I am starting two of my own from nuclei, since at least I am guaranteed more sucess. Like you, the acquired hives are run down and their future less certain. All The best
Ray
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Newbee
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2005, 04:25:03 AM »

Hi Ray, well I suppose we really are quite close neighbours in an international forum sense. cheesy
See you at the practicle session tomorrow.
Cheers
Jan
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