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Author Topic: Frame spacing  (Read 1050 times)
Pond Creek Farm
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« on: February 05, 2009, 09:27:21 PM »

I was getting my equipment ready this evening and stacking frames inside to see what I had and what I need for this spring's expansion.  I remembered a question I had last year when I started but forgot to ask. Even with ten frames in the box, there is still room.  Should the frames be spaced evenly or should the all be pressed together which would leave a space at one end?
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 09:32:58 PM »

Brood frames should be together in center of hive.  Closer in brood chamber is the norm I think.  Frames for honey could be spaced.  The bees will draw comb out deeper if spaced.  Some people only use 9 frames in honey suppers.  One less frame to extract with almost as much honey.

Mark
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009, 09:45:36 PM »

The frames should be pushed together and centered in the hive leaving about a 1/2 inch gap between the outside frame and the hive wall.  That space is there to allow the frames to be manipulated without rolling the bees.  Put you hive tool between the frames and twist it sideways to move the frames apart.  Do that on the other side.  You've now moved the frames to the wall of the hive and have a frame with 1/2 inch clearance on each side when removing it from the hive.

When done with your inspection be sure to reposition the frames the same way, pressed together and centered.  If you don't you'll find burr comb and loads of propolis between the frames during your next inspection.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2011, 11:29:04 AM »

Mr. Bray, sorry to drag up an old post but I have a question regarding frame spacing.  This short thread seemed to be pointing towards the answer.

I understand centering the frames to prevent burr comb from being built between the frames.  Will having the extra space between the outer frames and the walls of the boxes cause the bees to build burr comb there?

Ed
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2011, 12:27:33 PM »

Ed they just extend the combs out on the edges of the box - bee space.  You end up with fat combs on the ends.  Honey is stored there.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2011, 02:01:50 PM »

Thanks, BlueBee.  That makes sense.  I'm looking at roughly 3/4" from the edge of the top bar to the wall so does that mean the honey comb will extend out 3/8" toward the wall??

Ed
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American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev

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« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2011, 02:23:52 PM »

I believe the intent of the extra empty space on your outside walls was meant for room to pull frames out without rolling bees. Mine have built bridges from the #1 &#10 frames connecting them to the walls but not so bad as to cause a mess.
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FRAMEshift
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« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2011, 08:52:07 PM »

Will having the extra space between the outer frames and the walls of the boxes cause the bees to build burr comb there?

Sometimes the bees will build the end comb out and attach it to the wall of the box.  You might have to run your hive tool back and forth at the wall to sever that comb.  This is usually a small amount of comb and is not much of a problem.  Just be careful not to tear open the cells in the frame.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2011, 11:42:28 PM »

Thanks ya'll.  I think I understand roughly what I'll be dealing with.  When I finally put some empty frames in my empty supers it just looked like a lot of room there.  I'll keep an eye open for any burr comb that might be bridging the gap.  Thanks again for the feedback. 

Ed
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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev

"Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they wont come to yours." - Yogi Berra
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