Please help: mold on my capped comb - can i use that honey?

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TwoBigCats:
greetings,

SHORT VERSION:
is it safe to harvest and eat the honey from comb that appears to have grey powdery mold on it?

DETAILED VERSION:
last spring i installed my first-ever hive - 2 supers.  mid-summer i added a 3rd super and things seemed to be going fine until fall when i was hoping to extract some honey and found that the 3rd super had no comb / honey in it :(

i removed the 3rd super (now back to 2) and let nature take its course.  about a month ago, i noticed decreased bee traffic around the hive, then a week later, a bit of honey / nectar dripping out of the bottom / entrance to the hive.  i popped the top and had bees coming up at me in no time, so put the lid back on and left them to their work.
coupla days ago i noticed zero bee traffic so went out and they'd all left the hive.  nada, zip, zero.

so now i'd like to harvest the honey that they've left behind but find that some of the frames / cells have what appear to be powdery greyish mold on them.  is it safe to remove the caps / harvest the honey from that comb?

thx in advance, looking forward to my 2nd year of trying to herd bees :)

hal

http://twobigcats.blogspot.com/2009/02/harvesting-honey-our-first-year.html

justgojumpit:
I would probably avoid eating it myself, but you could install a package of bees onto those frames, and they will clean up the mold and use the honey.

justgojumpit

Brian D. Bray:
Quote from: justgojumpit on February 04, 2009, 07:14:20 PM

I would probably avoid eating it myself, but you could install a package of bees onto those frames, and they will clean up the mold and use the honey.

justgojumpit


That's what I'd do.  Freeze the frames that still have honey in them until just a few days before introducing the bees, then take them out, thaw them, and install the bees.  You won't have to feed because of the honey and the combs gives them a head start also.

TwoBigCats:
thx for your feedback, i'll follow your advice.

hal

Scadsobees:
A friend cut open a bee tree last spring that didn't make it and cut out all the honey and filtered and ate it despite there being a significant amount of mold growing.  He's still around, even though he said it wasn't the best honey.  He did say, though, that his family didn't get any infections after that. :roll:

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