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Author Topic: Dadant observation hive  (Read 1589 times)

Offline oldenglish

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Dadant observation hive
« on: January 31, 2009, 01:41:02 PM »
I just picked up a brand new dadant two frame observation hive dirt cheap. If I set this up with an exterior entrance could I keep bees in it year round or is it too small and only for demonstrations and displays ?

Offline BjornBee

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2009, 02:07:31 PM »
You can keep an O.H. going all year. It helps to plan on perhaps changing a frame out if need. And O.H's will swarm just like a full size hive.

The ability to see things in an O.H. is well worth it. You wil see things you never would see in a full hive.
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Offline rdy-b

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2009, 07:14:12 PM »
That is the one i market with and it is a little small to be self sufficient year round -but i need a small one to cary around so it suits my needs


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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2009, 09:58:38 AM »
I find three mediums or four deeps can be kept all year round but it's still a tricky proposition.  Less is a trickier proposition.  But it's worth a try.  It will tweak your beekeeping skills...
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Offline Bobb

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2009, 10:13:11 AM »
Maybe this is a silly question, but I'm new; What happens when it's kept inside and warm, 70F, but it's
 -5F outside. Won't the bees try to fly and freeze?
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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2009, 08:25:37 PM »
Maybe this is a silly question, but I'm new; What happens when it's kept inside and warm, 70F, but it's
 -5F outside. Won't the bees try to fly and freeze?

No, they go to the door and stick a finger in the air and if it develops frost on it they don't fly.   :-D

Regardless of the temperature inside the hive whether the bees chose to fly or not is dependent upon the weather outside the hive.  I've  found that they will occassionally fly in temps in the mid-30s and overcast with a slight wind.  Lower than that or more wind and they stay home.  As for the hive itself, it is the temp of the air around the cluster or brood nest that determines whether they remain in cluster or break it up.  That means that if the internal temp of the ambient air within the hive is in the mid 70's the bees most likely will not be a cluster but whether or not they fly is still up to outside conditions.
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Offline Bobb

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2009, 11:38:34 PM »
Thank you Brian.
Bobb
"Power, especially overgrown power, whets the ambition and sets all the wits to work to enlarge it. Therefore, encroachments on peoples liberties are not generally made all at once, but so gradually as hardly to be perceived by the less watchful; and all plastered over, it may be, with such plausible pretenses, that before they are aware of the snare, they are taken and can not disentangle themselves."

Samuel Webster
Massachusetts 1777

Offline gmcharlie

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2009, 05:30:38 PM »
does a observation hive make a good nuc box?   seems to me its about right for starting a colony to move out as it fills up???

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Dadant observation hive
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2009, 11:17:16 PM »
does a observation hive make a good nuc box?   seems to me its about right for starting a colony to move out as it fills up???

A 3 or 4 frame OB hive would work as a nuc hive.  It could also be moved from the OB unit into an actual nuc for wintering if need be.
Life is a school.  What have you learned?   :brian:      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!