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Author Topic: Planting for bees  (Read 3891 times)
Cindi
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« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2009, 12:31:16 PM »

Natalie, hmmm....they are plants that thrive in dry locations, perhaps the moistness of the area negatively impacted their growth. Did you by any chance keep the plant label tag? I would like to know the cultivar, I know there are several in the Sea Holly family.  I should really check out how exporting bare root plants works from Canada to the US.  Like I said, I have tons of the young, young, Sea Holly plants growing that are now two year olds coming up this year, and will bloom.  Many, many plants are shipped bare root, it is very common. Usually they are shipped in a small bag surrounding their roots, with a little spagnum moss inside, the tops not covered in plastic, in a little brown box.  They should ship well from a company in your area I am sure, but I will check out for ya, smiling.  Maybe I could send you a root or two, or I also have thousands of seeds saved, I could send you seeds too.  Are you willing to grow a biennial?  Have a wonderful most awesome day, life, great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Natalie
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« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2009, 12:36:06 PM »

Cindi those pictures are beautiful! I didn't save the tags from when they were shipped. I actully did for a while but when I was cleaning out my folder I threw away anything that didn't make it.
I would love to grow some, doesn't matter if its a biennial to me.
If you have any roots or seeds to spare I would be thrilled to get them and will obviously pay for the shipping. Just let me know if its possible. Thanks, Natalie
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2009, 01:14:25 PM »

I wonder if Sea Hollies like to grow in sandy soil or loam. Perhaps they can't take Clay.
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Cindi
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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2009, 10:12:38 AM »

Natalie, done, I am looking into cross border shipping of roots, I have some small ones I could dig up later, when the ground thaws (oops, I said freezes, now that made good sense eh?,hee, hee, smiling.....I meant thaws....or I could send you seed.  It does not like transplanting, but anything can be transplanted, if one takes certain precautions.

MILTA.  I have copied the general culture of Sea Holly (Eryngium Planum) from this site listed below:  Yes, sounds like it prefers dry soils.  My Sea Holly grows on a hill infront of the apiary.  Dry.  Clay holds moisture and also retains minerals/nutrients, Sea Holly prefers poor soils.

http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=H810

General Culture:

Easily grown in dry, sandy, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates poor soils. Tall plants may sprawl, particularly if grown in overly fertile soils or in anything less than full sun. Avoid overwatering. This is a taprooted plant that transplants poorly and is best left undisturbed once established.


Have a wonderful, great day, health, Cindi
« Last Edit: January 15, 2009, 11:24:09 PM by Cindi » Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2009, 11:16:09 AM »

I'm with Cindi on the may benefits of Teasel. In some places you've got to be careful or it becomes a weed, but if you can safely plant it it's a wonderful addition to some waste areas.

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poka-bee
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« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2009, 01:37:40 PM »

YAYS, Cindi is back!!  You will have to tell us of your adventures on vacation! Teasel. teasel teasel teasel...what a fun word!!Cindi, they are beautiful different flowers I will look for seeds or plants in my travels.  Love things that come back & flourish.  Will have to check to see if they are toxic to livestock... Thanks for my fun word of the day! grin J
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Cindi
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« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2009, 11:30:27 PM »

YAYS, Cindi is back!!  You will have to tell us of your adventures on vacation! Teasel. teasel teasel teasel...what a fun word!!Cindi, they are beautiful different flowers I will look for seeds or plants in my travels.  Love things that come back & flourish.  Will have to check to see if they are toxic to livestock... Thanks for my fun word of the day! grin J

Oh Jody, you makka me smile.  Yes, I am back, had a very busy time these past little whiles, I will tell that tale at my Daughter's house soon, still so swamped with stuff around here, realtors, eeks......

Teasel, teasel, teasel....oh Jody, wonder where that word tease comes from.....wonder if the teasel and tease are related.  I love that word.....Do you think JP knows these two words, smiling.

Jody, if you go and buy seed, I will personally come over to your house and give you a good spankin'.  You know ding dang darn well that I have hundreds upon thousands of these seeds.  If you were to purchase seed I would be extremely annoyed (not that I would ever really know, unless I came to your house unexpected and saw Fuller's Teasel growing in your yard, smiling).  Lean on me.  I will send you as many seeds as you would require.  And you know something, for that dollar or so that the postage is, all I can say is "whatever"!!!!!

Can you take a guess how many millions of seeds there would be if I were to take apart the bouquet of seed pods that sits on my coffee table in the front room?  Come on.....take a guess...I dare ya.

Have a most wonderful day, love and live this unimaginably wonderful life that we all live and share, health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2009, 06:49:47 PM »

Quote
Teasel, teasel, teasel....oh Jody, wonder where that word tease comes from.....wonder if the teasel and tease are related.  I love that word.....Do you think JP knows these two words, smiling.

The world's a strange place.  In England they use Treacle instead of Molasses and Crumpet instead of muffin.
You can't get French fries in France unless you order freets.
And the list could go on, and on, and on, and........
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2009, 09:34:27 PM »

Brian B.  Oh yes, I know ding dang darn well what you are talking about, the world is full of the strangest things, smiling.  Have a wonderful and most greatfully, gratious, grateful day, health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
poka-bee
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« Reply #29 on: January 17, 2009, 11:46:57 PM »

Cindi, I would love any seeds and/or chunks you want to send my way!  I will pay postage. The best part of gardening is that you can make friends & family part of your yard,thinking of them every time you see a plant they provided.  Dad is literally a part of my yard...his ashes are under a rose I bought specially for him. I am slowly building up the soil again in the lawn area & have lots of "natural" soil amendments coming from the chix & pasture to add the beds.  I'm making one along the N side of the house of shade plants.  That side only gets light sun in the early am & late afternoon/eve.  Then I'm making beds along the fence line so I don't have to weed-eat the grass...I hate doing that.  Teasel is still a fun word to say!  J grin
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Natalie
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« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2009, 11:43:53 AM »

I have decided to get rid of all of the grass area on either side of my house. On one side is my driveway and I ripped up all of that last year and planted a very large flower bed at the end of the driveway leading to the fence to the back yard and I started with all along the side of the driveway but it got too late in the season to finish planting.
If I can fill in that area there will be flowers and shrubs with a stone pathway leading to the house and driveway.
On the other side of the house I planted shrubs all along the perimeter of the house and fence and then there is a big boulder in the middle that I planted flowers around.
So now I want to fill in the middle area between the rock and the border around the house and backyard.(think L shaped) with plants.
This will not only cut down on having to mow little strips and odd areas of grass that are all over the place but will give the bees a place to eat ( I planted lots of agastache) but will give it a finished look instead of choppy little gardens here and there.
The thing is, it is so expensive to do all this. Last year I bought over 100 plants and I am still only halfway done.
I really hope they all come back this spring too, its been a cold winter but I spread hay over the beds and the snow is a good insulator.
I would love to complete the front yard this year and then I will keep working on the backyard, which seems never ending. I need to fence in my vegetable garden this year because I am tired of doing battle with the veggie eating chickens.
I tried the water scarecrow last year that is motion activated and sprays and spins around when someone sets it off but I kept forgetting that I had it and I would get sprayed more than the animals.
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Cindi
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« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2009, 01:53:45 PM »

Jody, oh you still make me laugh, yes, teasel is a fun word, picture this, teasel, teasel, teasel, teasel.  Then tease.  Think of JP, he is the biggest teaser of them all, and there are others that come to my mind too, men, teasing, teasing.  They love to torment us women!!!

Anyways, Jody, I will send seeds.  Something that I am thinking of is:  I know that I have mountains of seeds that I could send to my forum friends, if they should only ask.  Something to also think about.  These seeds weigh absolutely nothing, a mere whisp of weight.  The postage would be minimal, only the amount that it would take to send a regular sized envelope, I think the U.S. postage is around a dollar.  If I made a list of the plant seeds that I have, then my forum friends could PM me with their desired seed.  I would be willing to absorb the price of the postage, it is nothing, only that dollar, and everyone here is worth that, if it cost me $50 in the end, after 50 friends asked for seed, so be it, it is nothing to me.....Anyways, I would like to hear some thoughts here, Jody comply.

I still have to look on the site for exportation of stuff between Canada and the U.S.  I don't think that there is any issue with sending bareroot plants.  I know that I have purchased plants from the U.S. and there was no issue with sending bareroot.  An example of this would be:  strawberry roots.  That is the biggest one that I can think of off the top of my head.  I have a little time on my hands right now.  The ground is still too frozen to work to do any digging of perennials to ready for the eventual move, so I have some internet time.  I just need to get off my butt and get to work on the cyberspace stuff that I know that I have to deal with.  So be it.  Comments here please, elaborate on anything.  AND.....have that most wonderful and awesome day, and remember to always -- attract that wonderful health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2009, 11:02:59 PM »

Thanks to all who gave such great information, expecially Cindy.  I'm looking forward to planting my "bee crops".
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