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Author Topic: Save a beehive in the snow??  (Read 2768 times)
jusme
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« on: January 22, 2009, 06:31:41 PM »

Hi, I'm Julie.  I was building my very first beehive today, and other than the studying I've been doing I've never handled bees.  Anyway,  my neighbors cut a tree down today and I now have a beehive laying in the snow in the woods behind my house.   Any idea if I could save these poor creatures?  I have a Nuc box build but no foundations....Any suggestions??
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dhood
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2009, 07:12:31 PM »

I would suggest trying to keep them standing upright, in the log until spring, just set it up and put a top on it. If you cut the log open now they will not survive the winter. If the honeycombs get damaged in the log they will likely die also.
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2009, 07:18:19 PM »

i agree.  don't try to get them out.  if you can't get them upright, at least try to make sure they have a way to get in and out of the hive.  preferable their original opening.  they may not make it if to exposed, but they will not make it if you try to move them out now.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
jusme
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« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2009, 07:22:41 PM »

Thank you very much.  If I leave them should I put any food (sugar water) or anything in with them.  I'm not sure how damaged the combs are.  It's a mile back to the site and it's to dark to check them tonight.   
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2009, 07:26:28 PM »

i wouldn't bother with syrup if you can leave them.  they should have honey.  if you try to trap them out because of severe damage to hive, you might try some lemon oil in think syrup spray to make the box more attractive.  it's a long shot, in my opinion, unless they can stay where they are until spring.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2009, 07:29:53 PM »

there's a lot of info. about feeding bees on M. Bush site http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfeeding.htm

I wouldn't feed right away, if I did feed I would use the mountain camp method, and just put dry sugar on top of newspaper above the colony. BTW, make sure that they stay dry, moisture will kill them.   Daniel,
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jusme
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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2009, 07:34:42 PM »

Thanks....sounds like I'll be leaving them.  I'll walk back tomorrow and see how bad the damage is.  Sorry the posting was so vague,  but I couln't get to them before dark,  and the neighbors were afraid of them so I couldn't get many details.  I'll build them a dry shelter and hope they make it...thanks again for your help.
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2009, 07:39:09 PM »

Good luck and let us know how you make out!
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jusme
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2009, 07:45:07 PM »

Thanks again for your help.  I joined this forum this afternoon,  I was trying to find some other Michigan beekeepers.  I'm really glad everyone suggests leaving it.  I really didn't want to start my beekeeping adventure this way.  I'll let you know how they do.  Thanks again....Julie~
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dhood
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2009, 07:52:37 PM »

BTW, order a couple nucs or packages early to make sure you get some next spring in case these dont make it. If you wait you may get stuck waiting another season.
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JP
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2009, 08:06:17 PM »

Hi, I'm Julie.  I was building my very first beehive today, and other than the studying I've been doing I've never handled bees.  Anyway,  my neighbors cut a tree down today and I now have a beehive laying in the snow in the woods behind my house.   Any idea if I could save these poor creatures?  I have a Nuc box build but no foundations....Any suggestions??

I have two important questions for you.

1) How long has the tree with the bee section been laying down?
2) Do you know if your area has small hive beetle?

In my area if the bee section has been laying down more than 2 days you can rest assured the colony has been devastated by shb and efforts to save them or feudal.

Not trying to get your hopes down, but look into this before you get your hopes up.


...JP
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jusme
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2009, 08:16:57 PM »

Oh, honestly my hopes aren't really high anyway.  I realize the chances are slim.  They cut the tree down this afternoon.  I've been building hives and will be purchasing 5 Nucs in the spring.  Would it be a bad idea to move the bees from the woods (if they make it)  near my new hives??  If they have mites or something could they affect my new bees??   Yeh,  I'm I'm totally new to this.  And I have no idea if we have beetles here.  I'm in a small town and don't know of any other beekeepers in my area to ask.  I have to drive 80-100 miles to purchase Nucs this spring unless I can find someone closer.  I'm still searching the web for info about bees in my area.  Nashville Michigan is between Grand Rapids and Battle Creek.  If anyone knows of beekeepers in my area,  I'd love to here from them...eager to learn...Julie~
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kathyp
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2009, 08:28:54 PM »

i can already tell you are going to be good at this smiley

your new bees will get mites anyway.  don't worry about that now.  don't know what to tell you about moving them.  why don't you give us more info when you get a chance to look tomorrow.  take pics and ask a moderator to post them for you.  that will give everyone a chance to give you better advice.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
JP
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« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2009, 08:29:57 PM »

Oh, honestly my hopes aren't really high anyway.  I realize the chances are slim.  They cut the tree down this afternoon.  I've been building hives and will be purchasing 5 Nucs in the spring.  Would it be a bad idea to move the bees from the woods (if they make it)  near my new hives??  If they have mites or something could they affect my new bees??   Yeh,  I'm I'm totally new to this.  And I have no idea if we have beetles here.  I'm in a small town and don't know of any other beekeepers in my area to ask.  I have to drive 80-100 miles to purchase Nucs this spring unless I can find someone closer.  I'm still searching the web for info about bees in my area.  Nashville Michigan is between Grand Rapids and Battle Creek.  If anyone knows of beekeepers in my area,  I'd love to here from them...eager to learn...Julie~

Ask them if they wouldn't mind positioning the bee section of the tree in an upright position like it was.

You can move them to your yard but I would keep some distance to quarantine them but chances are things should be fine.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
iddee
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« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2009, 08:49:32 PM »

Try to get the tree cut to where you can get the section with bees in it's original orientation. "vertical" Cover the top to keep the rain out. Moving them now won't make any difference. Anything they will give your hives, or vice versa, will happen equally at 10 feet or 1 mile. Leave them in the tree log until your area has blooms in the spring. Then do a cut out or trap out.  If you feed inside the log, use granulated sugar, dry.  You could set up a liquid feeding station 50 feet from the log, but they would only use it on days above 45 F. That could be in addition to the dry sugar inside the log.
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jusme
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« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2009, 09:04:19 PM »

I'll check them out tomorrow, take some pictures and let you know.  They said the bees were hanging off the side of the tree before they cut it down.  That seemed strange, as it was only about 20 degrees here.   It was a huge beech tree and it it was so high up they thought it was a fungi fungas growing on the tree.  It'll be interesting to see how many bees we're talking about.  I guess the hole in the tree was baseball size but the fungus that grows on the beech trees here are football sized so there must have been quite a few bees hanging outside. Overcrowding?  Or is that normal?  I'm wondering how deep the hollow is they're living in.  I'll let you know tomorrow. 
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MustbeeNuts
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« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2009, 09:11:03 PM »

HI, I'm 50 miles west of GR. North of Muskegon. Not that close but there are a lot of us around here. just hidden. LOL
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2009, 10:26:12 PM »

Hi
I'm not too far away, and I've got a log with a hive in it to pick up soon too.

Not a whole lot that you can do, just get the log upright or however it was originally, any holes that would let rain or snow in covered.

We had one last year, but it died in Feb.  Didn't do much to it, and it had plenty of honey left.  Ah well, you get what you pay for, right? Wink

Rick
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Rick
tlynn
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« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2009, 11:03:08 PM »

Julie,

Welcome!  It's terrific to see new folks become interested in beekeeping.  It's a real addiction.  All the best to you in looking after your find.  We are eagerly awaiting pictures.

Tracy
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jusme
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« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2009, 04:12:40 PM »

Well, no excitement at all.  The entrance hole to the hive was on the bottom of the log so I had to lay on my back to look into it.  Not one bee.  Not even any dead ones.  The log is about 10 feet long and I have no way of telling how deep it's hollowed out.  There is more than one hole in the log so maybe the bees are farther in than I can see.  The guys are going to haul it up with the horses and work on it with chain saws, but I don't know when they'll be able to do it.   It looked to me like an animal may have gotton part of the hive.  There seems to be lots of honey left, but there's really nothing I can do with a log 10 feet long and 3 feet across so I guess I'll wait and see when they cut it open.  It's was still a nice walk in the woods and the Amish girls were trying to teach me how to say "What a Bummer" in Amish Dutch......Maybe next time.....Thank you all for you help....Julie!~
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